ADMA signs up to new Thrive Global Asia Pacific platform

New regional version of Arianna Huffington's wellbeing platform is being delivered via a new deal between Thrive Global and Monash University

ADMA has signed on as the first reseller for a regional version of the Thrive Global platform being provided under an exclusive agreement with Monash University.

Monash University has joined forces on creating an Asia-Pacific program with Thrive Global, the platform created by Arianna Huffington aimed at improving mental health and productivity for individuals and businesses. Huffington is the founder of the Huffington Post, author of several books and was listed by Forbes as one of the most influential women in media.

Under the new agreement, Monash University is the exclusive partner for the new Thrive Global Asia Pacific program, which will combine Thrive Global and the tertiary institution’s capabilities to provide companies with education and tools for improving the mental wellbeing of employees.

The Association for Data-driven Marketing and Advertising (ADMA) said its decision to be the first partner for the platform in region recognises the additional stress and anxiety marketing and advertising professionals are facing in the COVID-19 environment. According to ADMA CEO, Andrea Martens, the pressures of isolation, budget contractions and the inability to switch off have compounded an existing mental health epidemic in Australia.  

“In these extraordinary times of uncertainty, anxiety and stress, taking care of well-being is more important than ever,” said Martens. “ADMA has identified that mental resilience, improvement in wellbeing and in productivity are paramount as we manoeuvre through these times.

“We believe offering access to Thrive Global is an ideal way to positively affect businesses across the country. Marketers are usually early adopters and can communicate action. By offering Thrive as a tool to marketers first, we believe it will positively impact the whole business.”

The platform is a mix of science, storytelling, micro-learning user experiences, tools and assessments across four main journeys: Recharge, Fuel, Focus and Connect. Its overall aim is to develop healthier, long-lasting habits. ADMA members or non-members can sign up for a 12-month subscription to the program ($345 or $395 respectively), and group discounts are being offered.

Leading the Thrive Global alliance regionally via Monash University’s Business School is Professor Alex Christou, Managing Director Asia-Pacific.

“To have two iconic and distinguished organisations, which take an evidence-based approach to mental health and wellbeing, creates the ultimate destination for organisations to illustrate that they care for their employees while simultaneously lifting performance through productivity and engagement,” Professor Christou said. “We have the capacity to customise to each organisation and individual through an AI-driven [artificial intelligence] digital journey to help instill new behaviours, protect mental health and lift performance.”

Thrive Global has worked with more than 100 companies worldwide through its behaviour change technology platform including Walmart, Hilton, SAP, Microsoft and Accenture.

Commenting on the need for Thrive Global as part the Monash University announcement, Huffington said the business world was already in a mental health crisis before COVID-19. The pandemic has only amplified the issue. “In ordinary times, being able to manage stress and build resilience is important - and right now, it’s essential. Employee wellbeing underpins corporate performance and is a catalyst for growth,” Huffington stated.

“Our partnership with Monash University provides the opportunity to share all our science-backed tools and resources to help employees navigate the unique challenges and uncertainty we’re all facing right now, across the Asia-Pacific region and beyond.”

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