Optus goes for education with 5G network campaign

Telco officially debuts 5G services, kicks off ABL campaign focused on playful explanation of what the new network brings to consumers

Helping dispel confusion around what the 5G network delivers to consumers is the motivation behind Optus’ first 5G network campaign.

The Singtel-owned telco officially debuted its 5G network this week, offering a 5G service to 138,000 homes as well as via on-the-go mobile services in more than 170 stores. The company said 5G will hit 1800 sites in the next 12 months, with more than 290 sites live today in Sydney, Canberra, Adelaide, Brisbane, Melbourne, Perth and other locations across NSW, Victoria and Queensland.

5G is pegged as one of the most important technology trends in the telecommunications market for the next five years by Deloitte, delivering higher bandwidth, enabling experiences such as high-definition virtual reality and 4k streaming video, and reducing latency in telecoms networks by a factor of 10 to less than 10 milliseconds.

Read more: What the 5G revolution will do to mobile marketing

Optus is promising top home speeds of 400Mbps, with current average speed at peak times of 164Mbps and a guaranteed 50Mbps download speeds at any time. The company has already signed-up 200 customers to its home service as part of a pre-launch pilot.

“Underpinned by a robust network deployment plan, we expect significant 5G customer growth as our 5G network expands and delivers customers a game-changing, world-leading experience on their 5G home and 5G mobile devices,” Optus CEO, Allen Lew, said.

But with plenty of confusion circling 5G and what it means for the typical consumer, Optus head of marketing, Melissa Hopkins, said the telco opted to put the emphasis on education in its inaugural marketing campaign.

The campaign is all about simplifying and explaining to Australians how 5G works. The campaign centres around several character groups of five, all beginning with the letter ‘G’ such as five geniuses, five grannies, five guitarists, and five game characters, and each explaining a different aspect of the new technology in what she said was a ‘playful way’.

The campaign was created in partnership with creative studio, Bear Meets Eagle, and Swedish direct, Andrea Nilsson of Revolver/Will O’Rourke, and is running as 30-second TV as well as cinema advertising.

“People don’t want something they don’t understand,” Hopkins said. “This is just the start of an ongoing conversation that we will continue to have with Australians as Optus 5G continues to roll out.”

To build on the focus of 5G in the creative construct, Hopkins said Optus had changed its launch from Optus to ‘Optu5G’ for the duration of the campaign.

Alongside the network service, Optus will launch 4k Ultra HD Live Football content via Optus Sport in June 2020, and is also working with OTT video content partners including 7plus, Amazon Prime video, Netflix, Fetch and Stan to optimise forthcoming 4k content for its network from next year.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.  

 

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

Hey there! Very interesting article, thank you for your input! I found particularly interesting the part where you mentioned that certain...

Martin Valovič

Companies don’t have policies to disrupt traditional business models: Forrester’s McQuivey

Read more

I too am regularly surprised at how little care a large swathe of consumers take over the sharing and use of their personal data. As a m...

Catherine Stenson

Have customers really changed? - Marketing edge - CMO Australia

Read more

The biggest concern is the lack of awareness among marketers and the most important thing is the transparency and consent.

Joe Hawks

Data privacy 2021: What should be front and centre for the CMO right now

Read more

Thanks for giving these awesome suggestions. It's very in-depth and informative!sell property online

Joe Hawks

The new rules of Millennial marketing in 2021

Read more

In these tough times finding an earning opportunity that can be weaved into your lifestyle is hard. Doordash fits the bill nicely until y...

Fred Lawrence

DoorDash launches in Australia

Read more

Blog Posts

Highlights of 2020 deliver necessity for Circular Economies

The lessons emerging from a year like 2020 are what make the highlights, not necessarily what we gained. One of these is renewed emphasis on sustainability, and by this, I mean complete circular sustainability.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Have customers really changed?

The past 12 months have been a confronting time for marketers, with each week seemingly bringing a new challenge. Some of the more notable impacts have been customer-centric, driven by shifting priorities, new consumption habits and expectation transfer.

Emilie Tan

Marketing strategist, Alpha Digital

Cultivating engaging content in Account-based Marketing (ABM)

ABM has been the buzzword in digital marketing for a while now, but I feel many companies are yet to really harness its power. The most important elements of ABM are to: Identify the right accounts; listen to these tracked accounts; and hyper-personalise your content to these accounts to truly engage them. It’s this third step where most companies struggle.

Joana Inch

Co-founder and head of digital, Hat Media Australia

Sign in