Report: Australian content marketers heavily focused on building audiences

ADMA-CMI findings reveals organisations are experiencing increase levels of success with their content marketing strategy

The majority of Australian companies see the benefits of content marketing for building audiences and long-term relationships provided they deliver high-quality content to customer, according to a Content Marketing Institute (CMI) and ADMA report.

The sixth annual Content Marketing in Australia: Benchmarks, Budgets, and Trends report, sponsored by LinkedIn Marketing Solutions, revealed 85 per cent of responding organisations are focused on content marketing as a way of building an audience with the goal of creating one or more subscriber bases. This was up from 69 per cent last year.

The report strongly outlines most organisations see the benefits of content marketing, and that successes achieved in content marketing have increased over the past year. It also noted the larger the organisation, the more likely it is to have both a centralised content marketing group as well as individual teams throughout the organisation.

Approximately three out of five respondents (59 per cent) outsource at least one content marketing activity. The majority of respondents outlined their content marketing efforts were successful and 48 per cent stated their success increased during the past year.

“It’s exciting to see Australian marketers, including those who are just starting out with content marketing, understand the importance of using content to build relationships,” ADMA CEO, Jodie Sangster, said in response to the findings. “There are no ‘quick fixes’ with content marketing. Marketers who commit to the approach, document their strategy, and create ongoing value for their audience will see long-term results.”

The report also found a higher percentage of respondents than last year in the adolescent phase of content marketing (38 per cent versus 28 per cent); with fewer in the young/first steps phase (32 per cent versus 38 per cent) or the sophisticated/mature phase (28 per cent versus 35 per cent).

“Nearly 60 per cent of respondents characterised their organisation’s overall content marketing approach as moderately successful, while 66 per cent of respondents reported that their organisation’s overall content marketing success increased [much more/somewhat more] compared with one year ago,” Sangster said.

Specifically, creating original content is the key to success. Three-quarters stated higher-quality content was the biggest factor that contributed to the increase in the overall success with content marketing. In addition, 88 per cent of respondents believe their organisation values creativity and craft in content creation and production.

Among the top stumbling blocks for content marketing are a lack of resources and time. Only 55 per cent of organisations agreed upper management gives them ample time to produce content marketing results.

The report was based on a survey of 2190 global respondents in June and July 2017, representing a full range of industries, functional areas, and company sizes. This report includes 120 respondents for-profit organisations in Australia.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

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