The rise of online retail marketplaces and what they mean for brands

We investigate how growing numbers of marketplaces, such as Amazon, eBay and Catch Group, could help as well as hinder Australian retailers

The impending arrival of Amazon on Australian shores has left many brands and retailers scrambling to implement a response.

While competition is capturing the headlines, it’s the way in which Amazon will serve the market that arguably offers the biggest industry shake-up and reshape how consumers access products and services for brands and retailers alike.

Amazon’s initial foray will most likely be based on its marketplace offering, allowing other brands and resellers to directly reach Amazon’s audience. It is a capability that will – at least initially – be familiar to what many retailers already experience through marketplaces such as eBay, Alibaba’s Tmall, and the recently launched local offering from Catch Group.

Online marketplaces, once the repositories for distressed inventories and run-out sales, now represent a legitimate channel to market. According to Digital Commerce 360’s 2017 Online Marketplaces Report, US$1.09 trillion worth of goods were sold on the world’s largest 18 marketplaces in 2016, accounting for 44 per cent of all ecommerce actually globally.

But with most marketplaces open to all players, how can any brand or retailer ensure they maintain their market position without becoming trapped in a race to the bottom on price?

Following the consumer

Ecommerce service provider, ChannelAdvisor, has worked with numerous brands to build sales through online marketplaces. Managing director for Australia, Simon Clarkson, says consolidation around a smaller number of ecommerce services is reflective of general consumer behaviour.

“People average about 33 apps on their phone, and 80 per cent of their time is spent on three of those apps,” Clarkson says. “That is creating a number of challenges for retailers and brands, such as ‘how do I make sure I am showing up on someone’s phone, and how do they find my brand and my product?’”

As consumers increasingly congregate around marketplaces, the market in turn has responded with a proliferation of these ecosystems. Australian ecommerce company for example, Catch Group, recently launched its own marketplace, offering 1500 products from a dozen suppliers to complement its Catch of the Day offering.

Catch Group co-founder, Gabby Leibovich, says the company is being careful to ensure the brands it brings on meet strict requirements.

“Our warehouse can only handle about 30,000 or 40,000 unique products, and many of them we don’t want or cannot carry, like bulky goods,” Leibovich says.  “We will only accept those that are reputable enough, have great prices, can ship, and provide customer service. We really can’t afford to lose our DNA, so don’t expect this to be another eBay – just the opposite.”

Leibovich says brands and retailers have to accept marketplaces as an inevitable component of the retail landscape.

“Australia is in its infancy when it comes to marketplaces,” he says. “In Europe right now, you have about 300 marketplaces, and the same goes for Asia. Every brand and supplier is on every one of them. And why wouldn’t they be there? The consumer is there.”

The proliferation of marketplaces is not being left unchallenged by the original and dominant player, eBay, which boasts 11 million monthly shoppers in Australia. Chief marketing officer, Tim MacKinnon, spent much of the last four years recruiting major retailers on to the platform, and now boasts 80 out of Australia’s top 100, backed by 35,000 additional businesses selling through the platform.

“If you are a retail CMO now, it is a no-brainer decision to have a marketplace as one of your channels,” he says. “It is not an ‘either/or’. It is not that you stop investing in driving people back to your own destination, but you have to also be where they are.

“Part of that job as a retailer is trying to influence that customer to developer a relationship with you and come back to your properties.”

MacKinnon says eBay has no intention of owning the relationship with the consumer itself, making it markedly different to other players. This means eBay is happy to offer fulfilment options that take buyers back the retailer’s physical properties.

“We have driven over a million customers into the stores of Australian retailers,” Mackinnon continues. “We are very comfortable with our product being in Google search results. Amazon isn’t, and plays at being the destination. But we see ourselves as a partner in the ecosystem, and we’re happy to be wherever the customer is and help our retailers put their products wherever customers are.”

This stance has also seen eBay begin showing the attributes of an agency, by working with brands to create bespoke marketing campaigns.

“We can target that campaign to particular segments of customers they are interested in,” MacKinnon says. “We have our own media to run a full campaign, in a way they can’t do with Google or any other partner.

“We are not seeking to disrupt agencies, but we can play a role in helping retailers do paid search and social, because we have this incredible first-party data. We can follow customers on their shopping journey outside of eBay and help our brands target customers they are interested in speaking to.”

MacKinnon says access to a consolidated technology platform with these capabilities is what makes marketplaces so attractive.

“One of the things retailers get through a marketplace is access to technology that they can’t necessarily develop themselves,” he says. “For the 35,000 Australian small businesses that sell through eBay, that is as basic as having a mobile phone app: There is no way they could build an app themselves or be big enough to get people to download it and have that app on their first screen.”

Clarkson agrees one of the advantages of mature marketplaces is they can consolidate investments in technology in ways few retailers could achieve on their own.

“Marketplaces are very forward-looking around the way consumers are actually looking to buy, whether that is through mobile, computers or even through things like messaging,” he says. “It is within their interest to make sure they can connect the brands and retailers relying on them through to those consumers, however they may be searching.”

Fighting on fulfilment

In some ways, the emergence of online marketplaces resembles the emergence of shopping malls many years earlier. It’s a parallel not lost on John Batistich. In his nine years with Westfield (including five as director of marketing and digital for Scentre Group), he assisted in the global growth of Westfield Shopping Centres.

Batistich now devotes much of his time to helping retailers understand the impact of Amazon’s arrival, and their need to operate in a marketplace-driven economy. One of the first steps he advises any brand to take is to improve fulfilment experience for customers, regardless of whether they are partnering or competing with Amazon.

“Amazon’s core capability is delivering goods fast and cheaply, and Australia’s fulfilment model is broken,” Batistich says. “In Australia, typically it costs you $10, is delivered in three to five days, and then almost half of those deliveries do not get to your home when you are there and require a second delivery.”

Fulfilment is often raised as one of the key drivers of Amazon’s success – and is a key question regarding the composition of its entry into Australia.

According to eBay’s MacKinnon, fulfilment is one of the critical factors in determining whether a brand is successful through a marketplace, as it can greatly influence customer ratings. Hence eBay has introduced a guaranteed delivery option, as well as a new returns option with ParcelPoint that will even allow goods to be picked up and returned from the consumer’s home. It’s also been experimenting with free returns.

Even the duration of a returns policy can have a significant impact. “We have shown there is a very strong relationship between the return policy you have and conversion,” MacKinnon says.

“When you go from 14 to 30 days, it is a 5 per cent conversion uplift, and from 30 to 60 is another 6 or 7 points. It is a significant factor.”

For many retailers and brands keen to maintain control over both customer experience and pricing, selling through a marketplace can strip away many of the controls they experience through their own channels.

Up next: What marketplaces could do to price points

Join the newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

How challenger brands can win at biddable media

Challenger brands, especially in highly competitive markets, generally can’t match established players for media spend.

Chris Pittham

Managing director, Jaywing

The competitive advantage Australian retailers have over Amazon

With all of the hype around Amazon, many online retailers have been trying to understand how they can compete with the American retail giant.

Joel Milligan

Performance manager, Columbus Agency

How to become the customer experience custodian

The number one objective enterprises give for embarking on a digital transformation is to improve customer experiences with new engagement models, according to IDC’s 2017 global study.

Insightful article from an AdTech perspective

Mehdi Partika

Predictions 2018: 5 ways the CMO role will change

Read more

Sounds like a bunch of convoluted business bullshit with no real substance or value. Business people deluding themselves into thinking th...

Bupa Customer

Best CX Companies List profiles: Bupa's Voice of the Customer project

Read more

This partnership seems to bring a lot of benefits.

Uk Driver

Deloitte announces new agency partnership to expand digital reality capabilities

Read more

It's all about the experience and it seems that understanding is finally full tilt!

Danny Mack

Building a robust digital customer experience

Read more

I am going to visit Australia))) nice place ... one of the most attractive

Carly Julia

Tourism Australia aims for youth travel market with dedicated news channel

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in