Beehaviour launches new online behaviour tracking software

The Aussie customer insight startup's new proprietary software offers deeper insights into online consumer behaviour

Australian customer-insight startup, Beehaviour, has launched its patented proprietary software that will allow market researchers and organisations to gather information about online consumer behaviour.

Beehaviour’s software triggers pre-programmed questions before, during and after participants browse the web from within their chosen natural environment. These pre-programmed questions allow researchers and clients alike to understand how and why specific metrics being measured may change because of online behaviour, such as Net Promoter Score (NPS), consideration and awareness.

The software also allows researchers to understand where the target audience browses, when they browse and for how long.

Beehaviour is the brainchild of 30 year-old Sydney-based market researcher Jordan Thomas, who along with his two other founding partners, have been developing and refining the software since 2013.

“After years of working across various market research sectors in both Australia and the UK, it became clear that there was a gap in the market that could only be filled by the creation of a new and wholly unique software platform,” Thomas said. “It seems simple, but the question that we can now answer for organisations is ‘why?’ And by understanding the ‘why’ we’re able to provide unmatched insights into the online behaviour of our clients’ target markets."

How Beehaviour works

A panel of identifiable respondents, reflective of a client’s target market or stakeholder group is recruited. This can even include internal groups such as employees. The respondents then download the browsing application onto any of the major browsers (Chrome, Safari, Firefox or Internet Explorer) and then click the ‘record button’ when they want to record a browsing session.

Participants can use the technology, with the click of a button, in their own homes without the need for observation and can easily pause recording if they do not wish their behaviour to be monitored on certain sites. At the same time, researchers program and trigger specific questions to be asked of the participants relating to their behaviour and online choices - pre, during and post browsing.

This allows researchers to form a deeper understanding of key motivational drivers for online behaviour and provides organisations with direct ‘voice of the customer’ feedback that can be in incorporated into such things as web design, product pricing and even new product development.

Testing with Tesco

Beehaviour has already been working with major international brands, such as Tesco, who have utilised the platform to obtain insights into the behaviour of students who are seeking jobs with the organisation.

By utilising the ‘voice of the graduate’ in the design of its Early Careers homepage, Tesco was able to garner direct feedback on the design of the site that was used to greatly simplify the homepage before the commencement of 2016 enrolments.

“Our new software will provide market researchers with unparalleled behavioural insights and understanding which we hope will lead to better products and services, and ultimately better customer experience and outcomes,” Thomas said.

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