How Monster Worldwide is using social to build better brand engagement

Global job search site explains how social listening and analytics tools are being used to better understand job seekers as well as recruiters

Monster Worldwide has built up a significant global presence in the job search market over the past 20 years. Yet the rise of new digital competitors, along with growing social media interactions between job seekers and employers, left the business looking for ways to not only better understand both groups, but also rebuild brand might through digital engagement.

The US-based global online employment company operates in nearly 40 countries and has 4000 employees, with a centralised marketing team in Massachusetts supporting local marketing resources. Monster Worldwide director of digital communication and social media, Patrick Gillooly, told CMO the group historically took a scattergun approach to social, maintaining a host of tools that weren’t set up appropriately, several of which were run by an agency.

The need to foster positive brand sentiment and relevance by being actively involved in digital conversations made it vital that Monster lifted its social savviness, he said. In addition, recruiters are increasingly demanding better ways to connect with passive job seekers, another impetus to raise its social game.

To do this, Monster has significantly increased its social capabilities over the past two years, growing headcount from one person and the support of an external agency to bringing the vast majority of social activity in-house under a team of three full-time employees and one intern. Specific agencies are then used to assist with content strategy.

Several customer service staff have also been trained in social care and given social management tools to help resolve any product or service issues identified via social channels, he said.

To support the growing emphasis on social engagement, Monster went to tender for a centralised social media management platform and chose Hootsuite’s offering. Gillooly said there were three objectives: Scale, breadth and efficiency.

“We were looking at how we could start with our lean, global marketing team in the US and develop out a program and processes that could be brought to our regional marketing teams over time,” he said. “For Monster, our singular focus when it comes to social media marketing is engagement. We prefer to spend the vast majority of our time discovering and interacting with users on Instagram, rather than time posting out broadcasted Facebook updates, though we clearly need to do both.”

Gillooly said Hootsuite was chosen because it offered an integrated platform and dashboard, third-party app integrations, a reasonable pricing model and flexibility. In February 2014, Monster rolled out Hootsuite’s social media management platform and Campaigns tool, along with Brandwatch’s Analytics and data visualisation tool, Vizia, and several free and niche tools. This coincided with the launch of a social media command centre in Monster’s new global headquarters.

“It came down to the flexibility we craved: Hootsuite for its ability to grow with our company, and eventually, bring all our partners under one solution; and Brandwatch, so we could get very granular with how we wanted to listen to how the world talked about Monster and the employment market,” Gillooly said. “We also wanted to visualise all that data in our social media centre.

“Social media moves so quickly that keeping up can be a challenge. But when a well-formed set of tools puts the processes on autopilot, it allows us be nimble and react quickly to new changes.”

Engagement efforts

Monster is using the technology as a hub for all brand listening and engagement. As a first step, it set up dozens of keywords, handle and hashtag search streams to listen for various job seeker and employer signals. This was aimed at better tapping into current conversations. The company then uses Brandwatch Analytics to monitor its social brand presence across millions of online sources including social sites, blogs, forums, news and review sites.

To do this, Monster created Boolean search queries which determine the types of information the analytics tool searchers for. These are then pushed into the Hootsuite management platform alongside all other social activity.

Gillooly said this provides insight into what customers are saying about Monster, as well as their competition. It also helps reveal the content and engagement strategies working best with audiences across each social network.

“It has given us in-depth knowledge of the consumer [job seeker] and customer [employer] market, and allowed us to not only keep up with the trends in the market, but also keep ahead of them,” Gillooly continued. “In our social media centre, we often invite our customers in to take a deep dive of the data and watch as we use it for engagement purposes.

“As an example, we currently ran a query through Brandwatch looking for everyone who is talking about needing a job. We'll use that information to discover those job seekers Monster can help, and reach out to them, through Hootsuite's dashboard, to help set up an account or saved search so they can find a job they love. This is just one of hundreds of ways we're utilising the tools and data to talk to our audiences.”

Gillooly said Monster also uses the social Web as the “world's largest focus group”. In total, Monster is executing its social strategy across more than 20 platforms.

“Where do people love or hate their jobs the most? Where are people most often asking for help finding jobs? Where are employers most often tweeting about jobs? How does that match up to Monster’s job supply data? We can now answer all of these questions and it's all because of collaboration and sharing of information,” he said. “We’ve used social data to work with our colleagues in product and technology, customer service, human resources, sales and even pricing.”

Results

In the last three months of 2013 versus the last three months of 2014, Monster saw 262 percent growth in Twitter retweets and a 300-plus per cent increase in mentions. It also claims to have more than 30 per cent share of voice among its four other largest competitors.

“Those numbers have continued to grow significantly into 2015,” Gillooly said. Core metrics used by the marketing team to gauge success include overall engagement numbers, total mentions, media views and growth.

While there’s been an emphasis on organic social growth to date, Gillooly said the next focus for Monster will be improving paid advertising opportunities.

“We do quite a bit of social advertising, both as Monster’s brand and on behalf of our customers through products such as Monster Social Job Ads,” he said. “We're continuing to look at ad technology and how we can see the kind of scale, efficiency and, ultimately, human voice that we have brought to the organic side.”

More brand share their stories around social media marketing and engagement

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Does your brand need a personality review?

There are five tell-tale signs your brand needs to take a long hard look at itself.

Charlie Rose

Senior Strategy Consultant, Principals

How to create profitable pricing

How do we price goods and services? As business leaders, we have asked ourselves this question since the history of trading.

Lee Naylor

Managing partner, The Leading Edge

Sport and sponsorship: The value of event sponsorship

Australia’s cricketers captured the nation’s attention during their recent run to the semi-final of the ICC Men’s World Cup. While the tournament ultimately ended in defeat, for over a month it provoked a sense of belonging, hope and empowerment for millions of people across Australia. Cricket, and sport in general, has a near-unique ability to empower individuals, irrelevant of their background, demographic or nationality.

Nikhil Arora

Vice-president and managing director, GoDaddy India

I should check these guidelines. I think it's important for me. Thanks for the info!

Juana Morales

IAB releases social media comment moderation guidelines

Read more

I didn't know about that. Thanks!

Jamison Herrmann

Twitter 'recap' helps you catch up with missed tweets

Read more

😂😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

Max Polding

What it takes to turnaround an iconic Australian brand

Read more

I spend a lot of time in my professional life as a provider of marketing solutions trying to persuade customers that CX, UX, UI and Custo...

sketharaman

Gartner VP: Why CMOs and CIOs must band together to make CX a discipline

Read more

I live the best deals at LA Police Gear.

Tyrus Rechs

6 Ways to ramp up Social Media to Your Web Design

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in