Amazon's mystery locker is a marketing stunt with Nissan

One lucky person could win a car inside the San Francisco locker, Nissan said

Amazon's large locker in San Francisco is part of an ad campaign with Nissan.
Amazon's large locker in San Francisco is part of an ad campaign with Nissan.

A mysterious, massive Amazon locker in San Francisco is not filled with drones, but is part of a marketing campaign with Nissan.

The locker, which is named "Giant," was spotted on Thursday last week in front of San Francisco's iconic Ferry Building.

Amazon initially did not respond to questions about its purpose. Since then, however, a large Nissan logo was slapped onto the structure, along with the hashtag #giantlocker printed on one of its walls. Amazon and Nissan then said Friday that it was part of a marketing promotion between the e-commerce company and the Japanese car maker.

The companies are encouraging passersby on Friday to comment and post photos of locker using the hashtag. Those who do will earn a code to open the doors on the locker to win a variety of prizes, including Amazon music downloads.

"One lucky participant will get the surprise of a lifetime when his/her code opens the giant door, and s/he wins a new Nissan Rogue," a Nissan spokeswoman said.

The bright orange locker -- which is 16 feet wide, 20 feet deep and 8 feet high -- was attracting the attention of a number of people Friday morning.

Cars can be purchased on Amazon.com, but typically they must be picked up from a local dealership. Amazon and Nissan teamed up last year to have a Nissan Versa Note car delivered inside a huge Amazon box. But that box was different from the high-tech locker currently in San Francisco, which features an LCD screen and keypad.

Amazon operates a locker service, which lets shoppers have their items shipped to various locations around town instead of their homes. The lockers are much smaller than the structure near San Francisco's Ferry Building and are located inside stores such as 7-Eleven and Ace Hardware.

So Amazon's Giant locker, for better or worse, does not seem to be a company push toward larger pick-up centers in public settings.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

https://t.co/lCI1BkAPmH?ZwU...

luxuryfashions

DoorDash launches in Australia

Read more

In these tough times finding an earning opportunity that can be weaved into your lifestyle is hard. Doordash fits the bill nicely until y...

Fred Lawrence

DoorDash launches in Australia

Read more

Hello , great article!Fake followers have really become a big issue that needs to be identified and bring to an end.You can also include ...

Caitlyn Davis

Fake Twitter-follower market is adapting, growing, and getting ever cheaper

Read more

Did anyone proofread this document before it was published?

Beau Ushay

CMO Momentum 2020: How to embrace agile marketing

Read more

he decision to limit the initial version of the code to two US companies is discriminatory and will inevitably give an unfair advantage t...

Azeem Sohail

Google hits out at ACCC draft code of conduct for news media negotiations

Read more

Blog Posts

Creating a culture club builds ownership of teamwork

Workplace cultures are the sum of everyone’s beliefs, behaviours, attitudes and skills. This means that no single person is responsible for culture, it belongs to the team.

Colin D Ellis

Culture change expert, author

A Brand for social justice

In 2020, brands did something they’d never done before: They spoke up about race.

Dipanjan Chatterjee and Xiaofeng Wang

VP and principal analyst and senior analyst, Forrester

Determining our Humanity

‘Business as unusual’ is a term my organisation has adopted to describe the professional aftermath of COVID-19 and the rest of the tragic events this year. Social distancing, perspex screens at counters and masks in all manner of situations have introduced us to a world we were never familiar with. But, as we keep being reminded, this is the new normal. This is the world we created. Yet we also have the opportunity to create something else.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Sign in