Financial Planning Association on its COVID campaign pivot

As economic worries peaked, FPA retooled its campaign to address consumer uncertainty while keeping to its strategic brand pillars

The Financial Planning Association of Australia (FPA) recently launched its new campaign, ‘Ask a CFP professional’, to address current COVID-19 issues facing Australian consumers and prompt them to seek professional help for their finances. It was a deliberate decision to pivot this year’s campaign in response to the current crisis, but still fulfills a wider brand agenda.

The campaign consists of five central messages: Creating a solid financial plan, retirement and COVID-19, early access to super, reviewing financial position and having enough super for retirement.

In response to the financial uncertainty in the wake of COVID-19, FPA CEO, Dante De Gori, said the organisation wanted the campaign execution to convey a very clear message that there is trust in financial planners and what a financial planner can do.

The campaign will be rolled out via digital channels and audio advertising, starting on Facebook, Instagram and Google Search advertising, followed by digital display, podcast and regional radio advertising. The choice to go digital-first with this campaign is deliberate and very much a response to the current climate.

“Our research demonstrated out of home is declining in effectiveness due to more people working from home and government advice for Australians to stay home as much as possible,” he told CMO. “On the flipside, this also meant that digital media is becoming an even more powerful channel to reach consumers.”

While in previous years, campaigns have been rolled out across transport and shopping hubs, the choice was made to go 100 per cent digital. With COVID-19 gripping the world, “a lot had changed since we first began to plan and imagine this year’s consumer ad campaign” De Gori said.

The organisation had to make the decision to pivot its 2020 CFP advertising strategy to address consumer need for financial advice in this crisis climate.

“Given how the current financial crisis unfolded, our priority was running a campaign relevant to what Australians are going through and amplifies the critical role that CFP professionals are playing in helping consumers get on the other side of the pandemic,” De Gori said.

De Gori said FPA's wider marketing strategy is underpinned by three strategic pillars, known as the MAC strategy. M stands for members, A stands for advocacy and C for consumers.

“These pillars and the related strategic priorities guide our work, including marketing plans, until 2025,” he said.“Specifically looking at our consumer strategy, the FPA seeks to increase consumer awareness and use of financial planning. Given the current pandemic, this advertising campaign is about ensuring Australians know they can turn to CFP professionals for financial advice, particularly during a time of crisis.”

The organisation has also consulted with its own members for input on the strategy and direction of its campaigns.

“The planning for this year’s campaign has been a true member-led process, with the formation of the advisory panel consisting of eight volunteer CFP professionals who have been working with us on the strategy," De Gori added. 

“We also involved the whole professional membership by inviting them to vote on the strategic direction in January this year."

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.


Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together in Melbourne t...

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Are you sure they wont start a platform that the cheese is white, pretty sure that is racist

Hite

New brand name for Coon Cheese revealed

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in