Former Curtin Uni CMO and CMO50 honorary debuts new consulting business

Growth Generators focuses on improving marketing efforts around growth and agile, transformation and customer engagement strategy

Tyron Hayes
Tyron Hayes

Former Curtin University CMO and CMO50 top 10 honorary, Tyron Hayes, has debuted a new consulting offering aimed at helping marketing teams close the gap on culture, capability and innovation.

Called Growth Generators, the business is designed to bridge the gap between strategy and execution and takes its cues from the practical experience Hayes chalked up during his eight-year tenure at the Perth-based tertiary education institution.

His innovative work at Curtin, which resulted in the university’s first-preference market share growing from the high 30s to 53 per cent, led Hayes to be recognised in the top 10 CMO50 list in 2017.

Growth Generators is focused on three core pillars that drive growth, Hayes said. The first is design and innovation through a customer-centric lens, while the second is building an experimental modern marketing approach. The third is leadership and culture, which he said is about upskilling and aligning teams to build a high-performing and agile culture.

Informing the business approach was interviews with nearly 20 marketing leaders across several industry sectors including financial services and higher education.

“Most CMOs are grappling with at least one of the three areas of the offering depending on their stage of maturity,” Hayes said.

Hayes told CMO his approach will start with reviews to identify where the weak points are, then incorporate high-touch sessions, workshops and programs that help build up capability. He also expected to work with teams on transformation roadmaps, both in terms of org structure and technology, and even assist in running growth marketing sprints.

“Through discovery sessions, I’ve been asking where the current pain points and challenges are, then employed sliding scales for growth and agile marketing, high-performing teams, tech stacks and agency partners,” he explained. “That gives me an indicator of the level of maturity and which of the three legs may be shorter than the others in terms of my offering. I also ask where they’ve been spending their time and money through the funnel, from awareness to conversion, upsell and so on.”

One common challenge is capability uplift and cultural change in alignment with a digital transformation agenda, Hayes said. Another is internal structures to support both the organisation and a more high-octane marketing strategy, particularly with regards to improving agility. A third is executing against customer experience strategies and ambitions.

“This work has given me the confidence in my offering and where I can help,” he said. “If they’re at the start of a transformation journey, I’d like see myself as a transition partner, and can work on a transformation roadmap… if the CMO has been in the seat a few years and well settled in terms of org structure and brand, they may be ready for agile or growth marketing.”

Hayes agreed technology was another area many CMOs needed help, adding many have purchased the martech stack and “are driving the Ferrari like a Mini”.

“There may be some that need to build their tech stack roadmap, and that’s where I can help support depending on the level of maturity, and existing tech stack,” he said. “There will be some lightweight tech stacks I might use and bring in, but I’m working still on the more enterprise-level martech stacks and how to approach that piece.”

Hayes’ target customer base is medium to large organisations from any industry sectors looking at digital, marketing or cultural transformation. While seeing clear opportunities at a national level, he’s also open to international work.

As well as tapping into his own expertise, Hayes is looking to build a network of agency, consulting and technology partners that can assist depending on the needs of clients. The differentiator to other consulting firms will be a hands-on, customisable approach, Hayes said.

“Higher education, financial services, retail and large not-for-profits are some industries where we believe there will be initial demand for our services,” he said.

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