Kantar: Measuring what matters

Kantar on bringing metrics together at IAB's Measure Up conference

The issue of measurement and metrics has become somewhat polarised in recent years, with a focus on what is ‘good’ or ‘bad’. In fact, rather than ‘either/or’ when it comes to measurement of campaigns, everyone should be concentrating on ‘and’ and bringing everything together.

This is the view of Jane Ostler, global head of media insights at Kantar, who spoke at IAB’s Measure Up conference yesterday in Sydney.

The industry has become polarised on what’s good or bad, Ostler said. We talk about either/or when we should be talking about bringing everything together and validating different kinds of methods and metrics together.

This includes looking at short term and long term metrics, integrated strategies across campaigns, harmonising measurement including innovate channels, and making that data comparable.

Other recommendations include using insights early and often, mastering the media mix, she said.

“We cannot look at media channels in isolation. We have to understand how they work together,” Ostler said.

She also said she’s shocked at the lack of integration still happening in campaigns today.

“If you integrate a campaign, therefore make them recognisable all across all different channels, and then customise the campaign as well, and ensure creative execution tailored to each channel, stats have proven that will provide a 157 per cent improvement in brand metrics.

“I’m often surprised that many campaigns aren’t integrated at all. We all see things in different places, so campaigns have to hang together.”

Measuring and proving ROI is one of the key challenges for marketers and advertisers, as is understanding omnichannel performance, and optimising media investment.

“The debate is becoming increasingly polarised, brand vs sales, short term vs long term, creative vs media, etc., and this debate isn’t helpful, and it makes us an industry look like we don’t know what we are doing. We need to bring it together,” Ostler said.

“We live in a world of consumers and media isn’t the only thing that affects our decisions. Globally, 20 per cent of touchpoints have 80 per cent of the impact, so media is only part of the bigger picture.

“Also, different people have different opinions. Different age groups react differently to different advertising. Gen Z, for example, actually have different point of view about different advertising, which is why we are seeing the rise of branded content.

“Gen Z likes voting for things to happen, making decisions about story and characters, and experiences. These are all creative considerations, we are not just talking about standard ads anymore, and we have to figure out how to measure it. Netflix are about to launch a program where viewers can decide on the ending – so this is creeping into content and it needs to creep into advertising as well.”

Ostler also discussed why online advertising is not very effective, how to measure connected TV, and the changed GDPR has brought.

“Online advertising hasn’t done great, mainly because of clutter and formatting problems. Creative standards are lacking and we need to all pull together to make it work better,” she said.

“For connected TV, we don’t believe that passive behavioural data is the Holy Grail. A combination of attitudinal behaviour and asking questions combined with behavioural data is best, and you can validate one against the other.

“GDPR means a lot of passive data is difficult to get an agreement on, you have to ensure consent or you are financial liable.”

Overall, Ostler recommends setting clear objective before a campaign and focussing on measuring that objective.

“There is a big disconnect between what people in the industry are thinking. Only 55 per cent of advertisers are confident in their media mix.

“Overwhelmingly, marketers want a mix of long and short term results (85%). Because the studies show putting money into your brand and looking at a longer term trajectory means your brand can grow and will have a high value.

“But 48 per cent are measuring only short term. We need to be thinking about campaign strategy and deciding what to measure at that point, and not leaving it until the last moment. There needs to be way more strategy about what we are doing, and why.

“For 21 years the industry has been using clicks as metrics I think they are not helpful, clicks are not indicators of anything in particular. If you are chasing clicks then you are optimising on clicks.

“Instead, optimise to the data that for your campaign objective. If your campaign is awareness, then it needs to be optimised on awareness.”

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