Secret, an app for posting anonymously, lets users tap into Facebook

The app now offers Facebook log-in, to help members find more friends

Your employer or school can ask Secret to create a den where you and your colleagues or fellow students can share secrets.
Your employer or school can ask Secret to create a den where you and your colleagues or fellow students can share secrets.

How can something be a secret if all your Facebook friends see it?

Secret is a company that makes an app for iOS and Android to let users post messages "anonymously." When new members sign up, the app asks for their email address -- plus their phone number, which is optional -- in order to help them find friends who are also using the service.

From there, users can post messages, but with limited identifiable information attached to them, which may include their city, or whether the post was made by a "friend" or "friend of a friend." Messages posted at the Secret site range wildly in nature, shifting from tiny tales of jilted lovers to whimsical musings on procrastination to cliched inspirational sayings.

Before Monday, the number of friends that could be found by Secret was limited to the contacts in a user's phone, but a new integration with Facebook could let the "secrets" come pouring in from a wider number of people's friends. Secret now lets users connect their Secret accounts to their Facebook accounts . The app will let users find their Facebook friends who are also on Secret, to weave their "secret" posts into their streams.

It's been an oft-requested feature, Secret said. Some reviews for the app in Apple's App Store confirm this: "Wish it was a little bit easier to add friends. Perhaps an integration with other social media?" one person said last week in a review.

At the same time, it seems ironic to add Facebook integration to an app that's designed to let people post messages anonymously.

But logging in with Facebook is optional and it's done anonymously, Secret said, adding in its announcement that "we don't even store your public name."

Secret, however, already collects a large amount of information about its members by their very use of the service, including geolocation data. Gaining access to someone's name on Facebook might be the least of some user's worries, when things tracking cookies are already in the mix.

Secret, by encouraging wider use of its service, hopes to gain a competitive edge over some rival anonymous messaging apps like Whisper, which does not currently offer Facebook log-in. Secret also announced Monday a feature called "Collections," designed to give users more control over the types of posts they see.

The company also said it had raised US$25 million in financing, led by a number of investors, including Index Ventures and SV Angel.

If enough people opt to use the Facebook log-in feature, users on Secret could become more engaged with its service, knowing that more of their Facebook friends are there. But even with the integration designed to be anonymous, it may also make privacy-conscious people wary.

Zach Miners covers social networking, search and general technology news for IDG News Service. Follow Zach on Twitter at @zachminers. Zach's e-mail address is zach_miners@idg.com

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

Great content and well explained. Everything you need to know about Digital Design, this article has got you covered. You may also check ...

Ryota Miyagi

Why the art of human-centred design has become a vital CX tool

Read more

Interested in virtual events? If you are looking for an amazing virtual booth, this is definitely worth checking https://virtualbooth.ad...

Cecille Pabon

Report: Covid effect sees digital events on the rise long-term

Read more

Thank you so much for sharing such an informative article. It’s really impressive.Click Here & Create Status and share with family

Sanwataram

Predictions: 14 digital marketing predictions for 2021

Read more

Nice!https://www.live-radio-onli...

OmiljeniRadio RadioStanice Uzi

Google+ and Blogger cozy up with new comment system

Read more

Awesome and well written article. The examples and elements are good and valuable for all brand identity designs. Speaking of awesome, ch...

Ryota Miyagi

Why customer trust is more vital to brand survival than it's ever been

Read more

Blog Posts

A Brand for social justice

In 2020, brands did something they’d never done before: They spoke up about race.

Dipanjan Chatterjee and Xiaofeng Wang

VP and principal analyst and senior analyst, Forrester

Determining our Humanity

‘Business as unusual’ is a term my organisation has adopted to describe the professional aftermath of COVID-19 and the rest of the tragic events this year. Social distancing, perspex screens at counters and masks in all manner of situations have introduced us to a world we were never familiar with. But, as we keep being reminded, this is the new normal. This is the world we created. Yet we also have the opportunity to create something else.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Should your business go back to the future?

In times of uncertainty, people gravitate towards the familiar. How can businesses capitalise on this to overcome the recessionary conditions brought on by COVID? Craig Flanders explains.

Craig Flanders

CEO, Spinach

Sign in