AI links eye movements to personality, for better human-bot interactions

New study has potential to make robots socially aware by better gauging consumer's emotional and psychological responses

Improved human-bot interactions for better personalisation may not be as far off as we think, thanks to new research linking personality to eye movements using artificial intelligence (AI).

The research uses state-of-the-art machine-learning algorithms to demonstrate a link between personality and eye movements, and was developed by the University of South Australia in partnership with the University of Stuttgart, Flinders University and the Max Planck Institute for Informatics in Germany.

UniSA’s Dr Tobias Loetscher said the research, using special glasses, delivers important insights for emerging fields of social signal processing and social robotics. 

“There’s certainly the potential for these findings to improve human-machine interactions,” he said. “People are always looking for improved, personalised services. However, today’s robots and computers are not socially aware, so they cannot adapt to non-verbal cues. 

“This research provides opportunities to develop robots and computers so that they can become more natural, and better at interpreting human social signals.

Findings show people’s eye movements reveal whether they are sociable, conscientious or curious, with the algorithm software reliably recognising four of the Big Five personality traits: Neuroticism, extroversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness. There was no link demonstrated with openness, but given the small size of the trial, this doesn’t mean there isn’t one. 

“And thanks to our machine-learning approach, we not only validate the role of personality in explaining eye movement in everyday life, but also reveal new eye movement characteristics as predictors of personality traits,” Loetscher said.

“The predictive power is relatively modest at this stage. Eye movements wouldn’t be enough on its own, it would need to be combined with voice or facial recognition for the robot to understand what the humans are feeling. It would need to be a combination of a few things, rather than just eye movement. But the technology is improving all the time.

“There is also the problem of invasion of privacy around this kind of technology, that’s a big issue for marketers to consider as they move forward.”

Researchers tracked the eye movements of 42 participants as they undertook everyday tasks around a university campus, and subsequently assessed their personality traits using well-established questionnaires. 

The research wasn’t originally undertaken to assess personality and eye movements, it was designed with a more clinical intent in mind.

“We tested eye movements as a biomarker for future cognitive impairment or cognitive decline. There is some research to show that abnormality in eye movement may come before memory decline,” Loetscher said.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu   

 

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Thank you for sharing your knowledge. Definitely bookmarked for future reading! Check this website https://a2designlab.com/ with lots of ...

Pierce Fabreverg

Study: Gen Z are huge opportunity for brands

Read more

Thanks for sharing. You might want to check this website https://lagimcardgame.com/. An up and coming strategic card game wherein the cha...

Pierce Fabreverg

Board games distributor partners with Deliveroo in business strategy pivot

Read more

Such an important campaign, dyslexia certainly need more awareness. Amazing to see the work Code Read is doing. On the same note we are a...

Hugo

New campaign aims to build understanding around scope and impact of dyslexia

Read more

Great Job on this article! It demonstrates how much creativity, strategy and effort actually goes to produce such unique logo and brandin...

Pierce Fabreverg

Does your brand need a personality review? - Brand vision - CMO Australia

Read more

Here’s an article on solving the most complex customer queries without a delay. Hope it helpswww.engati.com/blog/address...

soham

How to manage social media during Covid-19

Read more

Blog Posts

A few behavioural economics lesson to get your brand on top of the travel list

Understanding the core principles of Behavioural Economics will give players in the travel industry a major competitive advantage when restrictions lift and travellers begin to book again. And there are a few insights in here for the rest of the marketing community, too.

Dan Monheit

Co-founder, Hardhat

Predicting the Future: Marketing science or marketing myth?

Unicorns, the Sunken City of Atlantis, Zeus: They are very famous. So famous in fact, that we often think twice about whether they are real or not. Sometimes if we talk about something widely enough, and for long enough, even the strangest fiction can seem like fact. But ultimately it is still fiction - stories we make up and tell ourselves over and over until we believe.

Kathy Benson

Chief client officer, Ipsos

Winning means losing in the game of customer retention

At a time of uncertainty and economic hardship, customer retention takes on much greater importance. CX Lavender’s Linda O’Grady examines the big grey area between ‘all’ and ‘best’ customers when deciding who is worth fighting for and how.

Linda O'Grady

Data Strategy Partner & Business Partner, CX Lavender

Sign in