Jaywing sets sights on Australian growth with digital and data-driven agency model

UK listed digital media agency combines two acquisitions and expands operations in Australia

UK data science marketing company, Jaywing, has officially set up shop in Australia off the back of its acquisition of Digital Massive last year.

The listed company, which focuses on digital and data-driven advertising, has 700 employees worldwide, 10 per cent of which it claims are “heavy hitting data scientists”. The group has made two key acquisitions in recent years to expand its operations: UK search agency, Epiphany Solutions, in 2014, and Australian digital media agency, Digital Massive, in July 2016.

Core services on offer include search engine optimisation, pay per click advertising, programmatic display advertising, analytics, conversions rate optimisation, design and Web development.

Local brand clients range from Tatts to Century 21, Compos and Wedgwood. Internationally, the list also includes Pepsi, Doritos, Toyota and Castrol.

Jaywing CEO for UK and Australia, Rob Shaw, said the company has expanded its client list, team, services capability, launched a new website and moved to larger premises since the acquisition last year. Jaywing has also brought on two joint managing directors to oversee the business: Chris Pittham and Tom Geekie.

“The performance of our core offer in Australia continues to be strong and the time is right for us to broaden it to more closely reflect the breadth of our UK services,” Shaw said. “It will allow us to expand our digital marketing and data offering and capitalise on opportunities to service clients in both countries through a single integrated approach.”

Jaywing reported revenue of £35.9m (AUD$63m) and gross profits of £31.8m in its full-year to 12 July 2016.

The company also struck a partnership with UK-based university, Imperial College London, 12 months ago around improving the use of emotional and neurological data for consumer insight. Specifically, the three-year program see Jaywing working with the College’s Data Science Institute (DSI) to measure, understand and predict people’s emotional response to marketing stimuli, an approach that has been adopted into its creative methodology.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

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