Swinburne and Adobe claim first with digital marketing course

The two have unveiled a course to equip students with the digital marketing skills they need to deliver on industry’s tech requirements.

Swinburne University and Adobe have partnered on a new digital advertising technology major and minor degree aimed at provide students with the digital marketing skills they need to deliver on industry’s fast-paced technological requirements.

The course can be undertaken as part of a Bachelor of Business, Arts or Media and Communications at Swinburne and is part of a world-first educational partnership with Adobe. The major and minor courses integrate Adobe Marketing Cloud software and Adobe training materials, as well as accredited teaching practices to solve a graduate skills shortage in the international marketplace.

Presenting at Swinburne’s Hawthorn campus recently, Adobe's director of transformative and digital strategy, Mark Henley, highlighted the growing gap between industry need and graduate skills in the digital marketing space.

“The digital skills gap in Australia is growing exponentially, and recent research has shown that a quarter of businesses are finding it difficult to source digital employees," he said. "Due to this, Australian businesses are seeing a heavy toll on their business."

According to Henley, Adobe wants students to go into the world with a head start and be able to get a job as soon as they graduate - because employers want access to the skills they have.

“With the growth in digital marketing functions, increased automation, and use of new technologies, there is a real demand for graduates to be able to understand and know how to use Adobe software,” he added.

In its first semester of being offered, the initial unit has attracted significant interest, with 88 students already currently enrolled. Over the duration of the major and minor, students will be trained to undertake tasks in areas including digital analytics, search marketing, social media marketing and video marketing.


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