Twitter offers new tools for customer service

Social media platform offers automatic direct-call-action plus new customer service capabilities

Twitter is looking to better assist brands with customers using its social media platform for customer service, offering two new tools to manage interactions.

Under its direct messages capabilities, Twitter is now giving businesses the ability to add a deep link into their Tweets that automatically displays a call-to-action button. This allows the customer to send the organisation a direct message.

A new customer feedback feature will also enable people to privately share opinions with a business after a service interaction. According to Twitter, businesses will be able to use two industry standard question formats for customer service scoring: Net Promoter Score and Customer Satisfaction.

The direct message feature is available globally from today, while the customer feedback tool will begin rolling out to brands in coming weeks, the company said.

According to Twitter, its advertisers received more than 80 per cent of their inbound social customer service requests on its platform. The company also pointed to recent research conducted on public interactions between customers tweeting a complaint on Twitter and airline brands, which showed those who receive a response are willing to pay an average $9 more for their next purchase from that airline.

In a blog announcing the new capabilities, Twitter quoted one of its partners, Sprinklr, as a major supporter of its new customer service features.

“Twitter’s new customer service features are a testament to the fact that brands need to quickly and effectively engage on the customer’s terms, on the channel of their choosing, and at scale,” said its head of product evangelism and partnerships, Elizabeth Closmore.

Caesars Entertainment also saw Twitter as a go-to network for its digitally connected guests.

“Understanding customer satisfaction in relation to the service we’re giving on social is incredibly important to Caesars, and we’re excited to embrace these two features to facilitate that understanding,” said its VP of digital, Greg Cannon.

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