What quantum computing could do for a marketer's data and information management

New studies into the uniqueness of quantum information for future technologies open up fresh possibilities for data utilisation

The digital era has been hard enough to come to grips with. But at its heart the term ‘digital’ is rooted in a very simple binary code of ones and zeros.

So what will life be like when we move to next era of computing beyond digital marketing, and open the possibilities of the quantum realm?

Across Australia and around the world, numerous teams are racing to create the first working quantum computers, which will take advantage of the unusual behaviour of matter at the atomic level, and may lead to machines many times more powerful than anything available today.

Researcher, Dr Jacq Romero, has been working with quantum principles for more than a decade. A recent winner of a L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science Fellowship, her work at the University of Queensland focuses on the principles of quantum information, and specifically the quantum principles of photons. This has led her into the study of the shape of light itself.

Dr Romero says that while we might be familiar with the shape of light emerging from a laser as a circular blob, that is not the only possibility.

“Actually light can be more interesting than that, and have many other shapes,” Dr Romero says. “That means you can encode more information in one photon, in contrast to what we have right now, which is zeros and ones.

“And because quantum information is inherently more secure than classical information, you can have high information capacity with unbeatable security.”

Dr Romero’s work is part of a global effort to make use of the uniqueness of quantum information for future technologies, starting with understanding what information is like in the quantum realm.

She says this work is essential if current trends for data growth are to continue, with estimates of a 50-fold increase between 2010 and 2020. 

“At some point we are going to hit a barrier, because the amount of data we are handling right now is unprecedented,” Dr Romero says. “Up til now we have attacked the problem by using classical properties of light more, such as colour and wavelengths and the time of arrival of different light pulse. In the future we will see more use of these higher dimensional properties, so that we can cope with the information capacity that we need.”

She says another advantage of the quantum realm is its inherent security.

“The edge that you have with quantum information is really the security aspect, because you cannot copy quantum information,” Dr Romero says. “And the other thing with quantum information is you can detect whether there is an eavesdropper.”

While it sounds like the stuff of science fiction, in September the Chinese-designed Micius satellite was used to conduct a quantum-safe videoconference between China and Austria.

Quantum computing has also become a key focus for the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, which has invested in quantum research at the University of NSW.

And while it might be some time before we enter the realm of quantum marketing, there is no shortage of startups looking for practical applications of quantum principles for the storing, transmitting and securing of data today.

L’Oréal Australia’s communication director, Christine Burke, says the L’Oréal-UNESCO For Women in Science program was established in 1998 to support and recognise women researchers, and to encourage more young women to enter the profession and progress with their careers.

“Science is crucial to tackling some of the world’s most pressing issues, and we need every talented mind available, be they men or women,” says Burke.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

 

 

 

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

Blog Posts

Creating a culture club builds ownership of teamwork

Workplace cultures are the sum of everyone’s beliefs, behaviours, attitudes and skills. This means that no single person is responsible for culture, it belongs to the team.

Colin D Ellis

Culture change expert, author

A Brand for social justice

In 2020, brands did something they’d never done before: They spoke up about race.

Dipanjan Chatterjee and Xiaofeng Wang

VP and principal analyst and senior analyst, Forrester

Determining our Humanity

‘Business as unusual’ is a term my organisation has adopted to describe the professional aftermath of COVID-19 and the rest of the tragic events this year. Social distancing, perspex screens at counters and masks in all manner of situations have introduced us to a world we were never familiar with. But, as we keep being reminded, this is the new normal. This is the world we created. Yet we also have the opportunity to create something else.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Sign in