Report: Consumers favour retailers offering customer loyalty programs

New Nielsen research finds consumers are more likely to return to a retailer if they have a program in place

More than half of Australian consumers will spend more with a retailer who offers a loyalty program over one who doesn’t, new research from Nielsen has found.

According to the latest Global Loyalty Sentiment Survey, 57 per cent of Australians are more likely to return to a retailer if they have a loyalty program in place, and 48 per cent will spend more if they know they’re going to be rewarded.

Across the global pool of respondents, 72 per cent also said they’d buy from a retailer with a loyalty program over one without.

Monetary incentives top the list of offers most desired by global consumers, such as product discounts (51 per cent), rebates or cashback offers (45 per cent), followed by free products (33 per cent). Frequent flyer points then ranked as the highest non-monetary benefit.

Across the split of millennials versus boomers, product discounts were more valuable to older consumers, while discounted shipping got a higher favourable response from millennials (17 per cent versus 9 per cent).

In addition, 67 per cent of Australian consumers participating in a loyalty program said it’s appealing to be able to earn rewards regardless of whether a purchase was made in-store, on a website or on a mobile device. This compared to about 80 per cent of global respondents.

“Flexibility is very important to Australian shoppers, now having access to an omnichannel experience when it comes to shopping,” commented Nielsen director of retailer services, Megan Treston. “This means they have access to bricks and mortar stores, online shopping, telephone sales and more.”

Treston said tailoring loyalty benefits for specific consumers, and using loyalty program elements to do this, such as an app, email or in-store integration, will also help retailers personalise rather than simply discount.

The Nielsen survey was based on more than 30,000 respondents across 63 countries including Australia.

Australia, along with Vietnam and New Zealand, were found to have the highest proportion of loyalty program participants across Asia-Pacific (84 per cent, 84 per cent and 83 per cent, respectively).

As it currently stands, presenting a membership card to be scanned remains the most common method of loyalty programs in Australia (81 per cent), against a global average of 45 per cent.Much higher across Asia-Pacific was looking up an account via a phone number, email address or other personally identifiable information in-store.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

Blog Posts

A Brand for social justice

In 2020, brands did something they’d never done before: They spoke up about race.

Dipanjan Chatterjee and Xiaofeng Wang

VP and principal analyst and senior analyst, Forrester

Determining our Humanity

‘Business as unusual’ is a term my organisation has adopted to describe the professional aftermath of COVID-19 and the rest of the tragic events this year. Social distancing, perspex screens at counters and masks in all manner of situations have introduced us to a world we were never familiar with. But, as we keep being reminded, this is the new normal. This is the world we created. Yet we also have the opportunity to create something else.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Should your business go back to the future?

In times of uncertainty, people gravitate towards the familiar. How can businesses capitalise on this to overcome the recessionary conditions brought on by COVID? Craig Flanders explains.

Craig Flanders

CEO, Spinach

Sign in