Instagram gains user momentum, passing Twitter

Photo-sharing site Instagram said Wednesday that its active monthly user base reached 300 million, a dramatic 50% increase in the past nine months.

Photo-sharing site Instagram said Wednesday that its active monthly user base reached 300 million, a dramatic 50% increase in the past nine months.

Instagram, which launched in 2010, edged past 8-year-old Twitter and its reported 284 million monthly active users.

Facebook, which bought Instagram in 2012 for $1 billion, has nothing to worry about. In September, the social network reported that its own active monthly user base had hit 1.35 billion.

"Over the past four years, what began as two friends with a dream has grown into a global community that shares more than 70 million photos and videos each day," wrote Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom in a blog post. "We're thrilled to watch this community thrive and witness the amazing connections people make over shared passions and journeys."

Zeus Kerravala, an analyst with ZK Research, said Instagram's impressive growth stems from its popularity with millennials, who have a strong connection with social networking, selfies and images.

"The younger generation, in particular, is a very visually oriented group that loves selfies," Kerravala said. "Pictures just say more -- they're fast and easy. Instead of saying, 'What a great view of the Grand Canyon,' snap a photo and upload it."

He noted that Twitter users can upload photos and short videos to the micro-blogging site, but the site is mainly used for its 140-character or less messages.

"I think Twitter is more for information dissemination, where Instagram is more about sharing content," Kerravala said.

In his blog post, Systrom said that while the site is becoming more popular, he wants to make sure that no one is impersonating a celebrity.

"People ask, 'When it comes to public figures and brands, how do I know that the people I discover on Instagram are really who they say they are? How do I know that this person really is Tony Hawk?'" he said.

To address that issue, the site on Wednesday launched verified badges for celebrities, athletes and brands in an effort to help assure users that the people they're following are who they say they are.

The badges will start rolling out this week.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

It's an interesting direction, and fair play that they've backed what their service differentiator in the market is. It's a bit clunky bi...

Jeff

Versa launches bot-activated website

Read more

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together to discuss AI.

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in