AMP reveals the lengths it takes to become customer-centric

Wealth and financial management provider details the transformative steps and cultural changes necessary for keeping up with customers

Wealth and financial management provider, AMP, has kicked off a host of transformative steps to become a customer-centric business, according in its latest financials, shining a valuable light on what it takes to keep up with customers in the connected age.

The ASX-listed group reported solid full-year financial results this week, including an underlying profit rise of 7 per cent to $1.12 billion for the full-year to 31 December 2015, and net profit increase of 10 per cent to $972 million. Key contributors were the Australian wealth management, AMP Capital, AMP Bank and New Zealand divisions, which all reported stronger operating earnings.

“This is a very good performance against a backdrop of challenging markets in the second half,” commented AMP chief executive, Craig Meller, who added business efficiency programs were also on track.

“AMP has a clear focus to be a more customer centric, efficient and international organisation. The execution of this strategy is unlocking the long-term potential of our business, which we are confident will continue to deliver value for our shareholders.”

While AMP’s financials should be well received by the market, it’s the steps it’s taking to become a customer-oriented enterprise that provide the best reading.

Over the past two years, AMP has been putting in place the core infrastructure required to become a customer-centred business. The company kicked off the journey in 2013, appointing its first chief customer officer, Paul Sainsbury, as well as a dedicated customer relations team.

Read more: Why digital delivery lies at the heart of AMP's customer transformation

On AMP’s list of ongoing strategic priorities is building a customer goals-oriented enterprise. In its FY15 financial report, the company said consumer research had “built conviction in taking a goals-based approach to products and services”, which will be rolled out from 2016. This work identified four priority goals, which are being used to provide new customer solutions this year.

AMP is also working to build a next-generation, face-to-face advice model based on customer goals. Thanks to the success of five pilot sites this year, AMP said it will extend this approach to 30 practices as well as automate several back-end processes.

New infrastructure has also been put in place for better omni-channel experience, including a new customer and data analytics systems, and customer interactions engine. The latter is already being piloted on targeted campaigns and next best offer-driven conversations across digital, call centre and adviser channels, with 20 campaigns in testing in the first half of this year.

These are tied into a new-look digital portal, which includes and integrated banking and wealth platform, mobile and tablet apps, new website and content management systems.

In addition, AMP has deployed a customer feedback and measurement system across 122 teams, as well as established organisational capabilities in human-centred design and behavioural economics. The company said customer-facing teams are now using this customer feedback to identify and improve service.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Supporting Association

Blog Posts

The real asset of small data – getting granular unearths opportunities

When most marketers use the word ‘data’, what springs to mind are large sets of numbers, Excel spreadsheets, cloud-based IT systems and complicated algorithms. Big data speak is the mot du jour. There is even a big data Week in London called the Festival of Data.

Pip Stocks

CEO and founder, BrandHook

Digital Transformation challenges for CMOs

New problems are rarely fixed by applying old thinking. In the last decade, a combination of circumstances has evolved that requires new thinking from marketers. This new thinking takes advantage of the digital environment and transforms business as we know it.

Mark Cameron

CEO, Working Three

Why innovation requires less certainty and more ambiguity

According to the Knowledge Doubling Theory, the sum total of human knowledge doubles every 12-13 months. With the full evolution of the Internet of Things, it will eventually double every 12 hours. Faced with such a sea of shifting data and knowledge, how can we make progress if we try to nail everything down to a certainty?

Matt Whale

Managing director, How To Impact

Need to improve your customer journey? We're excited to announce that we are holding that we are holding two more sessions of our sellout...

Proto Partners

Customer journeys: The new differentiation battlefield - Customer insights - CMO Australia

Read more

Thanks Mark. A third of customers leave brands after one negative experience, thats why it is ever so important that we optimise EVERY in...

Proto Partners

Customer journeys: The new differentiation battlefield - Customer insights - CMO Australia

Read more

Hi Kyle -- great piece. I couldn't agree with you more when you say that we as marketers are in the business of choice. I actually wrot...

Matthew Willcox

Tapping behavioural science for consumer influence

Read more

Great points. When it comes to optimizing the app experience, making sure you collect rich usage data is important, but making sure you c...

Dustin Amrhein

Why app engagement must be personalised - Mobile strategy - CMO Australia

Read more

You can also use automation to help keep the contact database nice and tidy. For example, programs that check and fix database values (eg...

automatico

3 brands using marketing automation for more than just email

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in