What brands like Burberry are learning through co-creation with customers

Former services standards executive from Burberry and now consultant on retail customer experiences shares how brands can tap into social media and customers to innovate

Francesa Danzi
Francesa Danzi

Shoppers around the world often look to fashion houses to set the latest trends. But even the most iconic of luxury fashion designers can learn a thing or two from its customers thanks to social media and co-creation.

For London-based luxury brand, Burberry, the journey to integrating customer concepts into its products began in 2009 with a simple online campaign called Art of the Trench. This called on customers to upload images of themselves wearing Burberry’s famous garment.

The campaign garnered more than 400,000 uploaded images in its first week, from fans in 191 countries, from a campaign based purely around public relations and word-of-mouth marketing including the fashion blog site, The Sartorialist. After nine months, more than 9 million visitors had come to the site.

Francesca Danzi was the global service standards manager for Burberry at that time. She pointed out that 2009 was a long time before the current ‘selfie’ trend had taken off. Speaking at the Customer Experience Tech Fest in Melbourne, she said the campaign enabled customers and fans to participate at two levels.

“Existing customers could upload their pictures, and aspiring customers could vote, like, share and start conversations with people that had uploaded pictures,” Danzi said.

“The designers at Burberry took a lot of inspiration from the styling of these people around the world. They started to see trends and ways of wearing this garment across cultures, and across the world, and started to give inspiration and create opportunities for designers internally.”

That lead to Burberry Bespoke, a service that allowed customers to design and order garments online. It also kickstarted Burberry’s social media activity. Burberry remains the most popular luxury fashion brand on Facebook, with more than 16 million fans.

Danzi went on to hold a number of roles with Burberry until leaving in late 2014 to start her own retail customer experience consultancy.

She said her experience at Burberry demonstrated the power of co-creation and sharing as a means of delivering value and profit by allowing customer participation, and balancing the producer’s desire for mass production against the consumer’s desire for something that is very, very personalised.

“Co-creation is right at the centre,” Danzi said. “It is industry-led, but has the customers at the core, and they can really participate. In a way customers and brands are at the same level.”

For Danzi, one of the most interesting examples of co-creation and the sharing economy happening today is Made.com, a furniture retailer that allows customers to vote on the designs that they want to see manufactured.

Because the company only has a limited showroom presence in the UK, it has created a service called Made Unboxed, where customers upload pictures of Made furniture within their own homes or workspaces. They can also nominate to allow would-be buyers to visit their homes to see and feel the products for themselves.

“They are testing it in the UK and it is working,” Danzi said. “It works because customers want to be inspired by not only the product itself, but by the way the product is put in a context.

“People are used to sharing, and their houses function as showrooms for the product. It is creating a crowdsourced customer service base.”

Danzi said Made is now considering an incentive scheme to further reward those customers who effectively become its representatives.

“When this happens it means the link between the customer has gone well beyond functionality and brand,” she said. “It is deeper, and it helps people to express themselves in a creative way and really participate with their own tastes, with their own knowhow, and with their own style, into the life of a brand.”

More on how brands are co-creating with customers

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Supporting Association

Blog Posts

Tapping behavioural science for consumer influence

We know full well the business we’re in as marketers is really the business of choice. But recent discoveries from behavioural science are leading to a psychological revolution that challenges many of the accepted models of how communication, creativity and advertising influence a consumer’s preferences.

Kyle Ross

Account director, TRP

10 ways of changing your culture through self-awareness

Did you hear about the manager who always shot the messenger whenever they brought bad news? He eventually stopped hearing bad news. Unfortunately for him, this wasn’t because there was none to report.

Steve Glaveski

Co-founder, Collective Campus

How to create a compelling customer experience vision

Organisations are seeking new ways to engage customers, drive new sales and increase customer satisfaction by providing engaging customer experiences. A customer experience initiative that lacks a strong, clear vision often fails to achieve its intended result.

Olive Huang

Research director, Gartner

There are lots of feature of microsoft dynamics crm by using these features you can grow your businesses. Some of them is lead management...

Dynamics Square

How Port Container Services is finetuning lead management with CRM

Read more

Agreed. I see the opposite problem quite often where people are tasked in an organisation just with "be creative" - thus offering no boun...

Dr Fiona Kerr

The great debate: Is data killing creativity?

Read more

By far, this is the best article I've come across so far that has a relevant information regarding the future of marketing. Although the ...

Jayden Chu

​Six ways to prepare for the future of digital marketing

Read more

These are some good ideas. You didn't touch on the overarching goals and results of brand loyalty. This article does a good job at provid...

hgsupport

Four ways to use social media to boost customer loyalty

Read more

This read like a PR PLUG for the agency. Very flowery language for the agency and very little details about the deal or the project.

Digital_Marketer

Why Tourism Victoria decided to go agile

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in