Social marketing goes mainstream but management strategy remains elusive

New Chief Marketer report into social media strategies employed by marketing teams finds most investing in these channels, but technology and content planning adoption is still low

Social media marketing might have gone mainstream, but the adoption of management technology and content policy strategies to ensure its effectiveness remains niche, a new report reveals.

According to Chief Marketer’s 2013 Annual Social Marketing survey, 77 per cent of all respondents are integrating social into their own or client campaigns, and are either using, or plan to use, a wide variety of social tools to engage with customers and prospects such as coupons, exclusive discount offers that are easily shareable, and offers targeted to geo-social networks such as Foursquare.

The highest percentage of marketers (54 per cent) will spend up to 10 per cent of their marketing budget on social marketing this year, while 20 per cent plan to spend between 10 and 20 per cent. Facebook is the most popular channel, followed by Twitter, LinkedIn and video aggregation sites.

Top reasons cited for social spending are the chance to reach multiple touch points (87 per cent), reaching customers where they are spending time online (64 per cent), because customers expect brands to be there (55 per cent) and starting a conversation with customers and prospects (49 per cent).

Nearly half of all those surveyed are producing unique content as a reward for engaging with the brand, and 32 per cent are displaying ads in social networks.

Facebook ad spend up as marketers embrace favour platform over Twitter
Ads are on the way for Instagram users
How going local with social is pumping up community engagement for Goodlife Gyms

While there’s plenty of investment going on, social media management is still in its infancy. Social management software tools are currently only being used by 34 per cent of respondents, although 16 per cent do have plans to invest in tools such as HootSuite or Crowd Factory this year. However, 39 per cent said they had no plans to do so.

Social monitoring technology adoption was similar, with 24 per cent using tools such as Radian 6, and 16 per cent planning to implement these systems by the end of the year. Nearly half of respondents have no plans to do so this year.

When it comes to who is looking after social campaigning, 38 per cent said the marketing department has primary responsibility, while 22 per cent have specialist social media staff. Thirteen per cent share social activity across multiple departments.

In terms of scheduling, nearly one-third said posting happens irregularly without planning (29 per cent), while 25 per cent said a few individuals create and post content within a few days planning. Just 16 per cent said that multiple stakeholders in their organisation created a calendar at least one month ahead.

The Chief Marketer survey was conducted by email in August. The report is based on 1020 respondents, of which 45 per cent were B2B marketers, 21 per cent were B2C, and 34 per cent covered both.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO Australia conversation on LinkedIn: CMO Australia, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

Signup to CMO’s new email newsletter to receive your weekly dose of targeted content for the modern marketing chief.

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Supporting Association

Blog Posts

Why 2017 will herald a resurgence of values-based marketing

It doesn’t take long for predictions to become predictable: The rise and rise of Facebook; advancements in analytics; the normalisation of chatbots; personalisation, programmatic, automation, authenticity… The prediction that’s missing from these lists is that in 2017 we will witness a resurgence of values-based marketing.

Jacqueline Burns

Founder, Market Expertise

Why customer experience driven growth is set to take off

Our overall brand perceptions are invariably shaped by our experiences. And loyal customer relationships can be severed in moments by a negative service interaction.

Consistency and conversation: How branding and advertising can work better together

Advertising and branding are two of the most visible outputs of marketing, which is why getting them right is so important. However, too often the line between branding and advertising becomes blurred. This means advertising activity can be out of sync with brand, resulting in poor results for both functions.

Dan Ratner

managing director, uberbrand

Someone needs a swift kick up the bum for such an idiotic idea.

random

​Why a degree is no longer enough to get you hired as a skilled marketer

Read more

The frequent flyer programs are the new profit machines for airlines all over the world, as they have morphed to be mass marketing machin...

Steve@iFLYflat

Velocity frequent flyers program strong performer in mixed half-year for Virgin

Read more

Hi Jennifer, thanks for sharing these info regarding the digital marketing trends.I've created a related video to this topic, would you m...

Fabio Carry

Predictions: 17 digital marketing trends for 2017

Read more

Great news. Marketing automation can be very useful for companies at various stages of development. With so many tools out there it's bet...

Ben

How HBF rolled out marketing automation in eight months

Read more

I read a report that the business sector in Australia as a whole have yet to fully harness and see the proactive change that predictive a...

Alex Martin

Report: Predictive analytics, IoT, machine learning battle it out for marketing dollars

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in