It's true! Facebook unveils video for Instagram

Will Instagram video boost Twitter's Vine or eclipse it?

After nearly a week of speculation, Facebook announced today that Instagram, its popular photo-sharing service, now supports video.

"It's where people come together to engage with each other," said Instagram co-founder Kevin Systrom, in a press event at Facebook's corporate offices in Menlo Park, Calif., which was also webcast. "It's not just about photos. It's about staying connected ... It's everything we know and love about Instagram but it moves."

And now, Systrom is hoping Instagram's 130 million users will use video to stay connected.

Starting today, users will be able to take and share video, which can be as short as three seconds or as long as 15 seconds, on Instagram. They'll also be able to stitch shorter videos together until they add up to 15 seconds.

Users, who will see videos mixed in with photos as they scroll down on Instagram, also get an editing tool and 13 video filters to improve the look of their videos.

"On Day One, 130 million people will have access to recording life's moments as they happen in real time," Systrom said. "You can capture a lot in 15 seconds. It's not too short to constrain your creativity but not so long that it holds up your download."

Another feature in Instagram's video offering, dubbed "Cinema," stabilises the images, doing away with shaky, nausea-inducing videos.

"Indeed, this is a good move for Instagram," said Brian Blau, an analyst with Gartner. "They are adding another media type as a pillar to Instagram, and that will give Instagram users more content creation options when they are sharing within their social network."

Instagram video is supported on iOS and Android, and can also be viewed on the Web.

Systrom noted about 16 billion photos have been shared on Instagram since it launched in 2010.

That could spell trouble for Twitter, which recently launched its own video service, called Vine, which enables users to shoot and tweet six-second videos that roll on a loop.

"Vine has just lost its uniqueness and could lose future growth," said Patrick Moorhead, an analyst with Moor Insights & Strategy. "If Instagram delivers, this will limit Twitter's full growth potential."

However, Blau said Facebook's move into video with Instagram could be seen as a "me too" kind of move.

"But [Instagram] also has extended the basic video features that you see in Vine by adding filters and image stabilisation, and that will make their video a bit more creative and compelling than what you see on Vine today," he added. "But I actually think this will help Vine. The whole idea being that Facebook/Instagram is now out in the market promoting short-form video content creation with simple-to-use tools that will help also drive people to check out Vine, as well."

Blau also noted that Instagram is still bigger than Vine since it can reach more people because of its connection with Facebook.

The social network bought Instagram last year for US$1 billion.

This article, It's true! Facebook unveils video for Instagram, was originally published at Computerworld.com.

Sharon Gaudin covers the Internet and Web 2.0, emerging technologies, and desktop and laptop chips for Computerworld. Follow Sharon on Twitter at @sgaudin, on Google+ or subscribe to Sharon's RSS feed. Her email address is sgaudin@computerworld.com.

See more by Sharon Gaudin on Computerworld.com.

Read more about social media in Computerworld's Social Media Topic Center.

Join the CMO newsletter!

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Supporting Association

Blog Posts

Why app engagement must be personalised

Research from Nielsen late last year reported Australian smartphone users over the age of 18 spend 33 hours per month in apps, and a mere four hours per month in browsers. But what does it take to actually maintain an app customers will engage with?

Rob Marston

Head of Airwave, A/NZ

Customer experience investments more vital than ever

The global commodity slump has hit Australia in the last few months. Companies that obsess over these developments might be tempted to cut spending on customer experience (CX) programs. Here's why that's a a terrible idea.

Harley Manning and Thomas McCann

Research leaders, Forrester

Managing brands in a digital world

With digital integration at the core of customer management, many marketers have been questioning whether the principles and approaches to branding are fundamentally different in a digitally led environment.

Jean-Luc Ambrosi

Author, marketer

Rob - great article. Here at Pure Oxygen Labs we could not agree more. When considering retail mobile apps deep linking is woefully unde...

Scott

Why app engagement must be personalised - Mobile strategy - CMO Australia

Read more

Project Leader?? Kim Portrate is one of the most ineffective leaders I have ever had the displeasure of meeting. She single-handedly cost...

Anonymous

Helloworld scraps CMO role

Read more

What tripe. This article conveniently makes no mention of her lies and bullying tactics and how she had placed everyone off-side with her...

Anonymous

Helloworld scraps CMO role

Read more

You mentioned cashback sites giving "immediate earnings" for transactions through their site. Cashback sites can take a couple of months...

RG

Are points-based customer loyalty programs on the way out?

Read more

Hi Jody,great post thank you. I think you're right in regards to the marketing evolution underway right now. I think it's incredibly inte...

Clinton Mancer

Tackling the skills shortage of the modern marketing age - Data-driven marketing - CMO Australia

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in