Cmo50

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Tim Hodgson

Establishing a completely new event in Australia, and the fast-paced change this requires is challenging enough, without it also being not for profit.

CMO50 2018 #5: Nick Reynolds

Over the past 12 months, Lenovo has been on a mission to boost customer centricity, creating a discrete global CX entity of 150 people dedicated to looking at customer journeys and finding ways to improve them.

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Ingrid Purcell

ME Bank’s Ingrid Purcell is one of an increasing number of marketers whose roles have morphed into holistic customer experience responsibility. It’s a shift that’s seen her take on accountability for designing the entire customer journey, not just focusing on traditional marketing areas, over the past year.

CMO50 2018 #12: Sweta Mehra

Since taking up the CMO mantle at ANZ last July, Sweta Mehra has been striving to go well beyond commercialisation and focus on building capabilities that will future-proof the bank. These, she says, are rooted firmly in the financial services group’s purpose across three levels: Enterprise, divisions and marketing.

CMO50 2018 #25: Yves Calmette

Over the last two-and-a-half years, Yves Calmette has transformed World Wild Fund for Nature Australia’s marketing department into an internal content agency powerhouse. It’s a move aimed at supporting aggressive income growth targets. And it’s a strategy paying dividends.

CMO50 2018 #23: Alison Levins

Marketing at its best is an “alchemy of science and art”, Mars Wrigley Confectionery CMO, Alison Levins, believes.

CMO50 2018 Ones to watch: Chris Taylor

“Consumers are not rational and never will be,” National Heart Foundation’s Chris Taylor says. “Connect on an emotional level and you’re half-way there.”

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Jane Power

No matter how busy you get as a CMO, it’s vital you stay tuned into raw insights on your customers by spending time listening to calls, and getting on the front line, Bupa’s chief marketing and customer officer, Jane Power, advises.

CMO50 2018 #3: Susan Massasso

The a2 Milk Company is an A/NZ success story, rapidly growing to $8 billion market capitalisation and NZ$922 million in revenue in the 2018 financial year.

CMO50 2018 #8: Steve Brennen

“Relationships really matter. If you want to be successful in your business as a CMO, you have to have relationships outside of your team.”

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Neil Ridgway

One of the most important decisions Neil Ridgway says he’s made over his 15 years as CMO of the Rip Curl brand is to support the group’s pro team with the resources they need to win 10 world surfing titles in 10 years. It’s this dedicated and focus that’s made the brand what it is today, he says.

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Tasman Page

The right team, the right measurement and data are what Tasman Page believes makes all the different to both marketing and bottom-line growth.

CMO50 2018 #1: Lisa Ronson

Lisa Ronson’s three-and-a-half years with Tourism Australia is a true CMO evolution story that culminates in the launch of the US Super Bowl campaign, Dundee.

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Ben Wilks

Whether it’s electrification of vehicles or new mobility concepts, automotive companies are facing significant change right now, Volkswagen’s Ben Wilks says. Increasingly, this means differentiating not just by product, but by experience as well.

CMO50 2018 #24: Dean Chadwick

​Every CMO should aim to be as commercial as the CFO and as technical as the CIO, Virgin Velocity’s Dean Chadwick believes.

CMO50 2018 #21: Brent Hill

​Being brave comes with the territory of being a successful marketing chief, South Australian Tourism Commission’s Brent Hill claims.

CMO50 2018 #26-50: Alexander Meyer

When Alexander Meyer joined ecommerce fashion retailer, The Iconic, in 2016, he was tasked with nothing short of building a cult brand.

Featured Whitepapers

State of the CMO 2019

CMO’s State of the CMO is an annual industry research initiative aimed at understanding how ...

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Blog Posts

How to design for a speculative future

For a while now, I have been following a fabulous design strategy and research colleague, Tatiana Toutikian, a speculative designer. This is someone specialising in calling out near future phenomena, what the various aspects of our future will be, and how the design we create will support it.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

The obvious reason Covidsafe failed to get majority takeup

Online identity is a hot topic as more consumers are waking up to how their data is being used. So what does the marketing industry need to do to avoid a complete loss of public trust, in instances such as the COVID-19 tracing app?

Dan Richardson

Head of data, Verizon Media

Brand or product placement?

CMOs are looking to ensure investment decisions in marketing initiatives are good value for money. Yet they are frustrated in understanding the value of product placements within this mix for a very simple reason: Product placements are broadly defined and as a result, mean very different things to different people.

Michael Neale and Dr David Corkindale

University of Adelaide Business School and University of South Australia

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