Customer experience investments more vital than ever

Harley Manning and Thomas McCann

  • Research leaders, Forrester
  • Website
Harley Manning is a VP and research director, Forrester, while Thomas McCann is a senior analyst, Forrester. Both are distinguished industry commentators on customer experience as a practice, discipline and growth strategy.

The global commodity slump has hit Australia’s vital mining and oil sectors, and the Aussie dollar has also taken a beating in the last few months, falling more than 40 per cent since reaching a high of $1.10 against the US dollar in 2011 to around US$0.75.

In the past, it could have been expected that China would come to the rescue. But that won’t happen: The Chinese economy just grew at its slowest rate in 25 years.

Companies that obsess over these developments might be tempted to panic and cut spending on customer experience (CX) improvement programs, despite the fact that many firms are sitting on piles of cash. But cutting CX budgets is a terrible idea because CX is the greatest potential source of competitive advantage – especially in times of high market volatility. For example:

CX leaders grow revenue 3x faster than CX laggards:

Forrester recently analysed the correlation between customer experience and revenue growth for seven industries in the US between 2010 and 2014. We found that companies with superior customer experience grew revenues faster than their competitors with inferior customer experience: On average, the eight CX leaders had revenue CAGR of 15 per cent, while their eight CX laggard competitors grew at an average rate of 2.5 per cent.

Superior CX drives customer loyalty and purchase intent:

When customers have a good experience it makes them want to stay with you longer, spend more with you, and recommend you: all of which drive revenue. This relationship holds true for mass market brands like wireless service providers as well as high-end brands like luxury autos – and even banks, credit card issuers, insurers and investment firms.

Companies with superior CX can charge more for their products:

Customers are willing to pay a higher price in return for a superior customer experience. That’s what we found when we analysed data from Forrester’s Customer Experience Index to determine the relationship between the CX Index score that customers give a brand and their willingness to pay a premium for that brand. It’s especially true for customers who rate an experience as outstanding.

That’s just the upside.

The downside risk of not funding CX improvements is also high: Your competitors that improve their customer experience while you stagnate will steal your customers and erode your margins. You’ll make it even easier for them if your employees become disengaged as a result of your CX flip-flop and start delivering a less satisfying experience.

Despite these harsh realities, it’s tough to stay focused when the world around you seems on the verge of panic. Here’s how businesses should stay grounded:

  • Connect with your customer pulse. Customers tend to have fast responses to volatility. But over time, the loyalty they show in response to superior customer experience stays evident – if you bother to look. Establish habits like regularly listening into contact centre calls and reading customer ratings and reviews of your products and services (and those of your competitors).
  • Do the math. Knowing that improving customer experience increases customer loyalty, add up the financial benefit of a one percentage point increase in customer retention for your company. Now try subtracting the financial loss from a one percentage point drop if CX stagnates and your competitors start luring away your customers. Whether you run the numbers based on revenue or profit, this exercise will help you make a visceral connection with what’s at stake.
  • Look up at the CX leaders. Top CX performers stand out when it comes to business performance, too. As of this writing, top-ranked PC manufacturer Apple has the highest market cap of any company on the planet. Amazon’s trailing 12-month revenue of US$107 billion beats Microsoft and Facebook combined. Seeing the real-world correlation between CX success and business success will help you overcome lingering doubts as to whether this connection is real.

As 2016 progresses, you can’t count on the markets settling down. CX investments will allow you to connect your customers’ excellent experiences to revenue, profitability, customer loyalty, cost reduction, and pricing power.

Tags: Forrester Research, customer experience management

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