The changing nature of brand power

Jean-Luc Ambrosi

Jean-Luc Ambrosi is an award winning marketer and recognised expert in branding and customer relationship management. He is the author of the new book, Branding to Differ, a strategic and practical guide on how to build and manage a successful brand.


Once upon a time, life was easy: You developed products, placed them in a well-located retail shop, wrapped them under an attractive brand and hired the best creative in town to promote them.

Advertising was king and when it didn’t sell products, you could argue it was building brands. That was the recipe for success. How sweet, or so we thought. Many business and brands were successfully built on this approach, even if it wasn’t always that easy.

Today, the digital ecosystem has disrupted our recipe for success, and the role brands play in building success. Anyone can build a digital presence and create a brand at almost the speed of light. As a result, there are so many products available under so many brands, it has become increasingly more difficult to attract sustained attention. Sustained is the key word here, as quick sales come and go with a bit of digital promotion.

What really matters today, arguably more than ever, is the trust a brand can bring to the purchase experience. This is particularly vital in the digital age. As more customers become physically disconnected with brands and the purchase process, brands need to bring an extra layer of comfort into their virtual relationship with customers.

While customers enjoy the ease of doing business online, letting their needs for immediate rewards go wild, they are also increasingly wary of post-purchase blues. These blues are created by the dissonance between what appears to be on offer and what is actually being sold and purchased.

The digital ecosystem has mastered the art of disguising the true quality of products, and modern customers need to rely on some reinforcement mechanism to press the ‘purchase now’ button.

This is where brands come into full flight. In many instances, the only rational and emotional bond between a pretty picture and nicely crafted copywriting, and the belief this is a genuine offer, is the brand. The brand is acting as the trust mechanism. It benefits both the rational brain, which is saying “for sure this brand wouldn’t sell me a dodgy product”, and the emotional one, which says “I trust them, this is great”.

Trust is now the primary driving factor in engagement. Consumers need to be able to trust who they do business with no matter how, where and when they decide to make a purchase, whether it be in the comfort of their own homes on their computers or tablets, or on the train via their mobile phones.

Trust has always been on top of the pyramid of needs. But today, it’s not just a want, it’s a must. If you thought digital could create lasting brands via a bit of promotion, then think again. Brands have more tangible meaning than ever and your commercial success depends on it.

Tags: digital strategy, omni-channel retailing, marketing strategy, brand strategy

Show Comments

Featured Whitepapers

State of the CMO 2018

CMO's State of the CMO is an annual research initiative aimed at understanding how Australian ...

More whitepapers

Blog Posts

5 cornerstones of a strong digital culture

Creating a strong company culture may sound like a daunting task, but it’s actually pretty straightforward. In fact, company culture is created in exactly the same fashion as a religion or democracy. Behaviours created from the organisation’s inception are reinforced over time by leadership, attracting like-minded people and eventually reaching critical mass to become an accepted ‘truth’.

Anthony Stevens

Founder and CEO, Digital Asset Ventures

Should you rebuild your company’s tech stack in blockchain?

The question I get asked most regularly these days is: ‘Do I need to rebuild my company’s systems on Blockchain?’ And the answer, every time, is ‘No, you’re asking the wrong question’.

Michelle O'Keeffe

CEO, Engaging.io

Customer value proposition: Getting the brand promise to your customers right

Throughout my career, I have witnessed a litany of brand names that profess to have a unique customer value proposition (CVP). In reality, however, they’ve had little more than a ‘value proposition’: A simple list of benefits applied to a general audience.

Ric Navarro

Global director of marketing and communications, Norman, Disney & Young

Hi there! Thanks for this interesting article! I love to read about new technology and software that makes our lives easier. I'm looking ...

Julia Summer

Wartsila overhauls Web platforms to create ‘seamless’ brand experience across all devices

Read more

RE: Sales and marketing SLAs, often the choke point isn't the teams but them getting the data into the tools they want to use with the da...

Ed Fry

Why sales and marketing alignment is more important than ever

Read more

Thank you for the good and very helpful information. It is very interesting. I love all the things you share and see your beautiful creat...

รัตนาวดี ภูมิวรรณ

Former eHarmony marketing chief joins telco startup

Read more

Colin Kaepernick, not Mike Kapernick.

thisisw

Zenith's innovation leader: Mid-digital age not benefitting media, brands or consumers

Read more

AGA KHAN HOSPITAL is in need of kidney donors for the sum of 2 crore, Contact us today if you want to sell your kidney for money, and thi...

Sebastian Friedrich

Mindshare gets behind blockchain advertising alliance

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in