3 Metrics to measure B2B content marketing ROI

Daniel Tolliday

Daniel currently works as content and inbound manager at Green Hat, a B2B digital marketing agency in Melbourne. Daniel enjoys writing about sales and marketing integration, HR, content marketing and social media strategy.

Content marketing has become a key pillar for marketing departments of all sizes across the world. But how do you measure – and ultimately prove – the effectiveness of the time, money and energy spent on content marketing?

Forty-six per cent of Australian B2B marketers say measuring ROI is their biggest marketing challenge, according to the 2015 B2B Marketing Outlook Report. Produced by Green Hat in conjunction with ADMA, the annual 2015 report surveyed 455 B2B marketers across Australia and highlighted the importance of measuring ROI and the difficulties facing content marketers.

But analysing basic metrics is just a small piece of the puzzle. To measure content marketing properly, it’s vital to first produce a content strategy then measure against SMART goals created for the buyer’s journey.

The buyer’s journey consists of three stages:

  • The awareness stage
  • The consideration stage; and,
  • The decision stage

So what metrics should be used to measure the effectiveness of your content marketing efforts?

  • Sharing and engagement
  • Consumption
  • Lead generation and sales

Most content and social media marketers rely on this metric for measuring their success. What this metric reveals is how many times people are sharing content via channels like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter – but doesn’t really show great detail or insight into engagement levels.

Fortunately, there are tools available that analyse engagement levels and shed further insight into how well your content is performing on social media channels. Some of these include:

  • Buffer
  • Klout
  • HootSuite; and,
  • SproutSocial

When you have plenty of shares, this is a good indication that your content is relevant and valued by your audience – even if it doesn’t reveal the entire picture.

How long do visitors spend viewing your content (‘time-on-site’) and how quickly are they leaving the page (‘bounce rate’)? This is the most well-known and basic metric that you can use to measure content and this data can be effortlessly acquired from Google Analytics.

With this data you can find out what types of content are performing the best and adjust your content production plan accordingly.

For example, if you notice your bounce rate is decreasing, this is a clear indication that your audience is getting exactly what they want (and you should keep creating content like this). On the other hand, if you notice that bounce rate is high, coupled with a short ‘time-on-site’, this means you should review the type of content you’re creating and try something different.

The previous two metrics focus on engagement and consumption, but what really matters when proving content marketing ROI is how many leads and conversions your content is getting.

When giving away eBooks or other types of premium content, you want to make visitors fill out a form prior to downloading. This process converts the visitor to a lead that can be nurtured through your email marketing process.

But what about finding out which pieces of content have sent the visitor to the lead generation form?

CRM systems enable you to see which pieces of content your leads are consuming – even after they have signed up to your newsletter. If your sales team converts that lead to a customer, you can find out how much revenue was earned and put a green tick next to the pieces of content they consumed along the journey – then give yourself a pat on the back.

Lastly, it’s more important than anything to create content that is not only aligned to your business goals, but also to the buyer’s journey. You need a watertight sales funnel and an awareness of your lead-to-customer conversion rate.



Tags: content marketing, B2B marketing

Show Comments

Featured Whitepapers

State of the CMO 2020

CMO’s State of the CMO is an annual industry research initiative aimed at understanding how ...

More whitepapers

Latest Videos

Launch Marketing Council Episode 3: Launching in the technology sector

Our multi-part video series, Ready to Launch, is focused on unlocking the secrets of launching brands, products and services by exploring real-life examples from Australia’s marketing elite. The series is being produced as part of the Launch Marketing Council initiative by CMO in conjunction with independent agency, Five by Five Global.

More Videos

NetSuite started out as a cloud-based provider of Enterprise Resource Planning software or as NetSuite solution provider, which companies...

talalyousaf

NetSuite to acquire Bronto's digital marketing platform for US$200m

Read more

Thanks for sharing this post, its really good information I get through this blog.CDPO Online Exam Training

Infosectrain01

3 ways Booking.com is improving its B2B marketing game

Read more

Time is of the essence, especially for customer service teams. With chatbots, you can interact and assist customers at a larger scale, al...

Jai

Triple-digit customer database growth, personalised engagement become reality for Stone & Wood

Read more

Hey Emilie - great read, and I particularly liked the section on the pressure of having brand purpose/Gen Z spending habits. It's great t...

Chris Thomas

Have customers really changed? - Marketing edge - CMO Australia

Read more

Extremely informative. One should definitely go through the blog in order to know different aspects of the Retail Business and retail Tec...

Sheetal Kamble

SAP retail chief: Why more retailers need to harness data differently

Read more

Blog Posts

The ultimate battle: brand vs retailer

At the beginning every brand is pure. Every founder with a dream cherishes the brand like a newborn. But very soon that newborn goes out into the big wide world.

Simon Porter

Managing director, Havas Commerce

How the CMO can get the board on the customer’s side

For some CMOs, it’s easy to feel alone in the undying quest to better serve the customer. At times, it feels like the marketing department and the boards are speaking a different language, with one side trying to serve the customer, and the other side more focused on the shareholders and financials.

Jeff Cooper

CMO and board, Business Excellence Australia

The Secret Ingredients of a CX-Led Company Culture

When I talk to organisations around the world about their customer experience strategy, it is often the CMOs and their marketing teams who take the lead. They’re keen to improve the ways they attract and engage customers, and they want to understand the technologies that can help them make their customer experience truly outstanding.

Steven van Belleghem

Author, CX expert

Sign in