Nestle confirms new brand names for Allen's Lollies

FMCG giant announces fresh names for Red Skins and Chicos in response to concerns of racial insensitivity

Nestlé has taken the wrappers off new brand names for its Australian Allen's lollies, Red Skins and Chicos, after deciding to rename the products in response to rising racial sensitivity globally.  

The confectionery and snacking giant has confirmed Chicos will now be known as Cheekies, while Red Skins will be branded Red Rippers. Both will start appearing on shelves from early 2021.

Nestlé originally announced its intention to rebrand the Australia-only products in June following the rising #blacklivesmatter movement and heightened protests and riots globally against racial prejudice. It’s one of several companies globally and locally to be taking such a step. Others include Australia’s iconic Coon cheese, US-based Uncle Ben’s, Pepsico’s Aunt Jemima and Eskimo Pie.

Nestlé said the decision to change the names of both Allens products was due to overtones which are out of step with the company’s values. In its statement in June, the company also said the decision acknowledged the need to avoid marginalising friends, neighbours and colleagues.

“Nestle has an unwavering commitment to upholding respect for our friends, neighbours and colleagues,” Nestlé general manager of confectionery, Chris O’Donnell, said following news of the fresh branding. “We hope Australians will support the evolution of these two much loved lollies – while the names are new, the lollies themselves remain unchanged. 

“We will keep pack changes simple to help lolly lovers find their favourites easily.” 

Packaging for both products debuted on Allen’s Lollies’ Facebook page with 10-second animated splashes. The brand changes received a tick of approval from a number of consumers, although several pointed to ‘ripper’ being a little too close to that of the serial killer, Jack the Ripper.  

Nestlé’s decision, and that of other brands to rethink their branding, has been applauded by the marketing and media industry as reflecting the changing consumer climate and growing desire for brands to be more sensitive to current culture.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.

 

 

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