Violet Crumble goes local with latest brand collaboration

Resurrected iconic Australian chocolate bar partners up with South Australian-based producer, Bickford's, on a new flavoured milk

Australia’s rejuvenated Violet Crumble brand has struck a new partnership with fellow South Australian FMCG, Bickford’s, to create a chocolate honeycomb flavoured milk. It’s one of several product collaborations from the iconic chocolate brand since its return to shelves last year.

The new Violet Crumble and Bickford’s 500ml flavoured milk will be available from this week nationally across Coles Express, Caltex stores, plus Drakes, IGA Romeo’s and Foodland supermarkets in South Australia. The product will also be sold via Bickford’s online Sippify store. The flavoured milk is being manufactured in Bickford’s Salisbury South facility using milk sourced by local provider, Global North.

The collaboration comes off the back of Violet Crumble’s successful partnerships last year with Golden Gaytime on a Violet Crumble ice cream, plus Krispy Kreme for two Violet Crumble donuts.

According to the company, research commissioned by Violet Crumble found one in three Australians ‘eagerly awaiting’ the release of a chocolate honeycomb milk. A leaked picture of the product circulated social channels in August, leading to positive engagement from consumers asking when the offering would be available.

Credit: Robern Menz


In addition, the two companies pointed to Roy Morgan research that showed people in South Australia and the Northern Territory to be the largest consumers of flavoured milk and iced coffee around the nation at 20 litres per year. That’s nearly double the national average. The research also reported South Australia as the only place where flavoured milk sales outstrip those of Coca-Cola.

CEO of Violet Crumble’s parent company Robern Menz, Phil Sims, said he was thrilled to launch the product and said Bickford’s was a no-brainer in terms of partner. Robern Menz purchased the Violet Crumble brand in 2018 and brought it back to Australian shelves last year.

“Violet Crumble is an iconic Australian brand and flavoured milk is part of an Australian past time, so we knew that chocolate, honeycomb and milk would make sense,” Sims said. “We know the demand for flavoured milk is there, especially in South Australia, and the positive feedback we have received already has proven this is going to be a big hit.”

PR and digital activities around the flavoured milk launch are currently being executed by Society, while Bickford’s is managing creative and point-of-sale. A spokesperson also told CMO product collaborations are a key part of the ongoing brand strategy.

“Violet Crumble as an iconic Australian treat is always open to exciting and new innovating collaborations,” the spokesperson said.   

Bickford’s group marketing manager, Chris Illman, said it was proud to be partnering with other iconic Australian businesses on the product.

“There has been huge interest from our customer base already and we are buoyant on the potential of this collaboration,” he commented.

Bickford's has also recently partnered with almond co to produce a range of almond milks.

"The dairy collaboration is the first as we focus on this strategy versus using the Bickford’s brand in that space," Illman added.

One of Australia’s most iconic FMCG products, the Violet Crumble was first invented in 1913 by Rowntree but eventually retired in 2010 when owned by Nestle. It’s now part of the Robern Menz portfolio alongside another iconic chocolate bar being resurrected, the Polly Waffle, plus FruChocs, Crown Mints, Bumbles Choc Honeycomb and JeliChocs.

Bickford’s has been around since 1839 and has a portfolio of cordials, soft drinks, flavoured waters, juices, coffee-based beverages, plant and daily milks.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.

 

 

 

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