Australian Digital Advertising Practices updated

AANA, IAB and MFA release latest edition of the Practices aimed at improving knowledge across the complex digital advertising supply chain

The AANA, IAB and MFA are calling on the entire digital advertising community to dive into the latest edition of their Australian Digital Advertising Practices in order to lift trust, transparency and knowledge of the supply chain across the industry.

The 2020 edition of the Australian Digital Advertising Practices comes two years after the first whitepaper was released and is again the result of collaboration between the Australian Association of National Advertisers (AANA), Interactive Advertising Bureau of Australia (IAB Australia) and the media Federation of Australia (MFA).

Their release also comes just a couple of months after a ground-breaking ISBA and PwC UK report found the complexity of the programmatic advertising supply chain has resulted in an average of 15 per cent of total ad spend being unaccounted for.

The Practices are based on the same five guiding principles - champion the consumer experience, educate to inspire change, shared ownership and responsibility, every value chain is unique, and fair value for outcomes delivered. The latest version covers six digital advertising value chain issues grouped into five modules, including a dedicated module on consumer privacy. The other areas explored are: Digital value chain, viewability, data governance, and the newly combined ad fraud and brand safety.

Each module includes basic descriptions as well as a checklist of questions and areas to focus on. There are also additional resources listed. For example, the digital value chain section includes descriptions for technologies and elements used throughout the process, such as SSP, DSP and DMP / CDP. The data governance module, meanwhile, includes types of data in use today as well as checklists for ascertaining if data has been gathered with genuine consent, verifying who owns it and where it’s stored, and ways data sets can be constructed.

The overarching ambition for the Practices is to be a starting point for advertisers, agencies and digital platforms to communicate around how they will operate together in order to build knowledge in the space. For all three associations, it’s acquiring knowledge that will engender trust between all parts of the digital advertising ecosystem. The associations are now working on building out training and education programs to further help individuals understand how to put the Practices into action.

In addition, the MFA Board has committed to ensuring all relevant agency staff undertake the Australian Digital Advertising Practices training program and complete a proof of knowledge to ensure they are across the updated best practice standards.

While specialism around aspects of the digital advertising ecosystem will always be required, the authors have made a plea this year for all sides of the digital marketing and advertising ecosystem to familiarise themselves with the areas highlighted by the Practices.

“While the Australian Digital Advertising Practices have primarily been developed for advertisers, given the rapid pace of change within the digital advertising market, we strongly encourage all players within the digital ecosystem to familiarise themselves with the content to better inform base-line conversations they may have with current and future advertisers,” the report authors state. 

According to AANA CEO, John Broome, the second iteration of the Australia Digital Advertising Practices should give marketers further confidence in how they’re managing digital campaigns. He noted collaboration between industry associations as a key signal of how important this cross-industry approach to best practices has become.

“Programmatic advertising is now an established choice within most marketers’ media mix. Yet it’s a complex and ever evolving supply chain,” he said. “A cross-industry approach to best practices that also includes embedding them through training and advancing capability is a powerful way to build trust, confidence and better business outcomes for all.”

Likewise, IAB  Australia CEO, Gai Le Roy, said the inclusion of the strong framework of agreed standards and practices for digital advertising is an important step in continuing to build trust and instilling confidence in the digital advertising value chain in the face of rapid change and innovation.

“For agencies, the Practices are a valuable tool in guiding conversations with clients, engendering greater trust and enabling them to work better together – which in turn should lead to improved effectiveness and better outcomes for clients,” MFA CEO, Sophie Madden, added.

The Practices are expected to be further updated once the ACCC’s first interim report into Australia’s adtech landscape is submitted in December this year. Kicked off in February, the Competition and Consumer (Price inquiry – Digital Advertising Services ) Direction 2020 inquiry reflects newly granted powers attained by the ACCC into regulating competition across the digital ad ecosystem. These powers were one of 23 sweeping recommendations made under the Government’s Digital Platforms Inquiry conducted in 2019.

The scope of the ACCC’s adtech inquiry now underway includes availability and transparency of information across markets around such services, the concentration of power across the market, auction and bidding processes, merger and acquisitions activity, supplier behaviour and more.

For AANA chair and Nestle’s director of e-business, strategy and marketing, Martin Brown, this kind of cross-industry initiative is what drives transparency through the digital supply chain.

“These collaborations will be enabled by a strong level of understanding and capability amongst marketers. That is why there is a strong focus on training for marketing teams in this iteration of the ADAPs,” he commented.

OMD CEO and MFA chair, Peter Horgan, said over the past two years, the Practices have helped facilitate better conversations with clients about the digital ecosystem. “This important update will ensure we remain at the forefront of technical, market and regulatory changes,” he said.

IAB chair and CEO of Pedestrian Group, Matt Rowley, also saw widescale adoption as the means to deliver fair value right through the digital advertising chain.

“They provide clear and usable guidance to help advertisers take better control of their advertising programs,” he said.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia

 

 

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