Latest martech lumascape shows thriving marketing tech sector

Data tech solutions show fastest growth in the latest annual marketing technology lumascape of 8000 solutions

The 2020 lumascape
The 2020 lumascape

Scott Brinker has officially debuted the 2020 edition of the Marketing Technology Landscape featuring more than 8000 marketing and advertising vendor solutions.

The year-on-year martech lumascape reports a 13.6 per cent increase in solutions on offer, even as 615 of the 2019 listees came off the map as a result of either acquisition or consolidation. Taking those 615 from the 2019 map, growth of new entries was 24.5 per cent year-on-year.

Brinker also noted an array of martech companies acquired from the 2019 lumascape of 7040 solutions were picked up by vendors not already featured, representing a change in ownership rather than a reduction in total vendor numbers.

Across solution categories, data showed the highest year-on-year growth at 25.5 per cent, with 1258 solutions listed on the lumascape. The second-highest growth category was management solutions, up 15.2 per cent to 601 solutions.

Other well-represented categories included content and experience (1936 solutions, up 5.6 per cent); social and relationships (1969, up 13.7 per cent); and commerce and sales (1314 solutions, up 9 per cent).

The latest report also shows fastest growing subcategory in each category, by percentage of growth. Brinker noted physical world interactions, such as print, retail proximity and Internet of Things (IoT) tools, along with data governance and privacy, video marketing, conversational marketing and chat, and project and workflow management, led the pack.

Since commencing the mapping activity in 2011, Brinker cited a 5233 per cent growth in martech solutions available to marketers today. Yet even with a long tail of solutions still available, he cited consolidation across the market, with a small group of enterprise solutions dominating global martech market share.

Then there are a few hundred category leaders, Brinker said. “Their solutions are more focused and dive deeper on a particular capability — say, social media management — but they still have tens of millions or even hundreds of millions of dollars in revenue,” he said, adding martech is a $121 billion industry overall.

As for where things are headed, Brinker predicted a rich and diverse ecosystem of players well into the next decade.

“Even with plenty of consolidation, the volume of net new software creation — although likely more ecosystem-oriented software — will continue to be robust,” he commented. “There is an ever-renewing spring of opportunities to make marketing better and few barriers to building an app in the cloud to address them.”

The impact of COVID-19 will nonetheless be felt, Brinker said, noting reduced business spending due to the uncertainty, along with marketing operations being stretched thin to deal with the crisis, and reduced VC funding currently being available.

However, he cited several tailwinds that should continue to propel martech investment and innovation forward, including less expensive products that thrive in platform ecosystems, the push around performance marketing and the overall lean-in to digital capability and transformation.

“The world is going to continue to become more digital. If anything, this crisis will accelerate the motivation for firms to embrace digital operations and digital customer experience. And that’s where martech thrives,” Brinker added.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.

 

 

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

JP54,D2, D6, JetA1 EN590Dear Buyer/ Buyer mandateWe currently have Available FOB Rotterdam/Houston for JP54,D2, D6, JetA1 with good and w...

Collins Johnson

Oath to fully acquire Yahoo7 from Seven West Media

Read more

Hi This is George, Thanks for sharing this nice information about foodpanda blockchain. During this pandemic situation food delivery indu...

George David

foodpanda launches blockchain-based out-of-home advertising campaign

Read more

Did anyone proofread this document before it was published?

Beau Ushay

CMO Momentum 2020: How to embrace agile marketing

Read more

JP 54, D2, and D6 EN590,JET A1 AVAILABLE ON FOB DIP AND TEST IN SELLER TANKWe Can supply Aviation Kerosene,Jet fuel (JP 54-A1,5), Diesel ...

Collins Johnson

Oath to fully acquire Yahoo7 from Seven West Media

Read more

An honest and hardworking conveyancer doesn't need a marketing strategy. His past clients will spread the word for him. These days the ho...

Bagen Andrea

What this millennial marketer is doing to shake up conveyancing

Read more

Blog Posts

Commissioning personas that get used

How to avoid the bottom drawer, and how to get value from the work you’ve paid for

Melanie Wiese

Chief strategy officer, Wunderman Thompson

Why It’s Going To Be A Bumper Holiday Season Despite the Pandemic

Behavioural science expert Dan Monheit, co-founder and strategy director of creative agency, Hardhat, writes that marketing chiefs should hold their nerve, as they have reason to be optimistic

Dan Monheit

Co-founder, Hardhat

Why marketing and UX teams must join IT on cyber security

For far too long, cyber security has been considered the sole domain and concern of the IT department, with other departments including marketing, UX and design, firmly entrenched in the belief it is not their concern. The reality could not be further from the truth. In fact, this view is dangerous as it could lead to irreparable brand damage and a lack of trust in consumer behaviour.

Nicki Doble

CIO, Cover-More Group

Sign in