McDonalds CMO resigns after four-year stint

Marketing chief, Jenni Dill, leaves the QSR after four years at the helm of its A/NZ marketing strategy

McDonalds is on the hunt for a new chief marketing officer following the resignation of Jenni Dill.

A company spokesperson confirmed Dill has resigned from the QSR giant in order to pursue new career opportunities. She’s held the top marketing job for the past four years, replacing former CMO and now GroupM managing director, Mark Lollback.

Prior to McDonalds,  Dill spent 25 years with PepsiCo, working her way up from segment marketing roles through to senior marketing director across both snacks and beverages in Australia and New Zealand.

A spokesperson highlighted a number of achievements during Dill’s time with McDonalds, not least of which was her development of a strong marketing function.

“Over the last four years with Macca’s, Jenni has been instrumental in building a strong team of marketers, leading the creation of big communications platforms for the brand, driving focus on Macca’s iconic core products and enabling rapid digital acceleration,” the spokesperson stated.

“We thank Jenni for her contribution, enthusiasm and commitment to the McDonald’s business, and we wish her well in her future endeavours.”

The company is now working to replace Dill, and said a new CMO will be announced in due course.

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