Macquarie Media name dropped following acquisition

Following the acquisition of the ​remaining 45.5 per cent of Macquarie Media​, Nine has dropped the name ​Macquarie Media​

Following the finalisation of Nine’s acquisition of the remaining 45.5 per cent of Macquarie Media for $113.9 million, officially concluded late last year, Nine has dropped the name Macquarie Media from the business.

Nine has confirmed it will drop the name Macquarie Media for its radio division, in favour of the call signs for top-rating stations 3AW, 2GB, 4BC and 6PR, while badging news bulletins under the 9News brand.

The group’s wider radio division will be known as Nine Radio. 

“Across Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane and Perth we have four famous brands in 3AW, 2GB, 4BC and 6PR and this move sees us looking to move them front and centre at the heart of the each of the cities they serve,” Nine’s managing director of radio, Tom Malone, said. 

Nine’s director of news and current affairs, Darren Wick, said the expansion of 9News would consolidate its place as the leader in news and current affairs across television, radio and digital throughout Australia. 

9News is a trusted household name across Australia and this move sees us extending that brand across all broadcast news,” Wick said. 

“The television and radio news teams across all states have already been working hand in glove for the past few months. In now branding our radio bulletins with 9News we are simply giving Australians the signal that they can rely on us to stay up to date, wherever they are and regardless of the platform.” 

The Macquarie Media brand will be phased out over the coming months. Nine News radio bulletins have already transitioned to 9News.

Nine inherited its majority stake in Macquarie through the Fairfax acquisition in 2018. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) did not oppose the merger between Nine Entertainment and Fairfax Media, even after admitting the deal was likely to reduce media competition.

The merger was first announced in July 2018, and brought together the two ASX-listed companies into one $4.2 billion goliath integrated media firm operating under the Nine masthead.

News of the largest merger of media companies in Australia’s history triggered significant concerns from across the media and supporting industries, with criticisms raised specifically by the MEAA.

Since then, Seven announced its plans last month to merge with Prime by acquiring all its issued shares, in order to become what it claimed would be the leading wholly-owned commercial premium broadcast, video and news network across Australia, reaching over 18 million people each month. It is also planning on divesting itself of its Western Australian radio assets to Southern Cross Media for $28 million. The merger looks set to reduce media competition even further, following the merger between Nine and Fairfax

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