Report: In-store sensory experiences increase sales

A new study has revealed sensory experiences increase in-store sales by 10 per cent

A new study conducted for sports retailer, Intersport, has revealed sensory experiences increased in-store sales by 10 per cent.

A behavioural study conducted by Walnut Unlimited for Mood Media and Intersport found sensory marketing has a positive emotional, cognitive and behavioural impact on shoppers. Shoppers spent almost six minutes longer in-store when the senses were activated, purchased 4 per cent more items, and higher priced items (increase of 6 per cent in value per item), when sensorial marketing elements were in place. 

The study found use of scent leads to 28 per cent emotional level increase in controlled experiment. 

Quantifying the Impact of Sensory Marketing used Galvanic Skin Responses (GSR) and Visual Eye Tracking (ET), along with exit interviews to measure customer behaviour and responses, to conduct a controlled experiment. 

The activity also found the use of scent is highly impactful when being used to highlight a specific department or zone. In the scented football zone in-store, customers’ emotional levels were elevated by 28 per cent compared to the baseline, for instance. From the installation of scent in the football area to-date, Intersport also noticed a 26 per cent increase in sales in the category in the test store compared to the same category performance in all the other stores throughout the country. 

Based on ET metrics, awareness of digital screens in-store increased by 5 per cent when moving visualisations were activated on-screen. 

Using GSR metrics meanwhile, the trio identified a lack of sensorial elements in-store caused many consumers to become awkwardly self-aware while shopping, with 17 per cent becoming more emotionally sensitive and uncomfortable in an unusually quiet and stimulant-free environment. 

GSR and ET metrics also showed a significant increase in nervous system activity and engagement when consumers saw themselves in mirrors and interacted with products in front of mirrors. In addition, shoppers showed a 50 per cent emotional increase when touching and engaging with a product. 

“Knowing 78 per cent of shoppers say an enjoyable atmosphere plays a key factor in purchasing a product in-store versus online, we partnered with Walnut Unlimited to develop behavioural and neuromarketing quantitative research that demonstrates how shoppers react first-hand to specific sensory experiences,” Mood Media global CMO, Scott Moore, said. “The results speak for themselves. A strategic top-level approach to incorporating in-store sensorial elements creates a measurable emotional response with consumers that delivers bottom-line results.”

Mood Media set up an environment, which was split into two phases in a store in Amsterdam. One was an 'all senses' phase where all the sensory elements were activated, including music, the scent of fresh-cut grass and animated digital signage. The other was a 'no senses' phase where the store lacked all sensory elements. These results were then compared to three Intersport ‘control stores’ which remained unchanged. 

Mood Media Australia Managing director, Steve Hughes, said if the high street is to continue to entice shoppers away from online, it must always put the customer first and consider what it is offering the consumer, not just the products it is selling. 

“Consumers aren’t just buying a product when in-store; they’re buying an experience and they are increasingly demanding it through their foot traffic. For many, shopping is a form of entertainment and bricks and mortar stores have a real advantage," he commented.

"Done right, shops can attract more new customers, a higher numbers of repeat visits, longer in-store dwell times and more recommendations."

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia 

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Launch marketing council Episode 5: Retailer and supplier

In our fifth and final episode, we delve into the relationship between retailer and supplier and how it drives and influences launch marketing strategies and success. To do that, we’re joined by Campbell Davies, group general manager of Associated Retailers Limited, and Kristin Viccars, marketing director A/NZ, Apex Tool Group. Also featured are Five by Five Global managing director, Matt Lawton, and CMO’s Nadia Cameron.

More Videos

Great read. I agree that it should be a perfect balance between interacting with your customers and knowing your brand. As a business, yo...

Caroline Scott

7 ways CMOs can improve their customer engagement game

Read more

Very true. Team development helps improve collaboration among the team members. I was able to improve my team's collaboration skills by t...

Quent Sinder

Why empowering others can help make you a great leader

Read more

CRM is a very good software that can help you succeed in your business. In my company, this system has allowed me to improve customer rel...

Anna Janicka

Sensis rebrands to Thryv and brings business software to Australian SMBs

Read more

AI Leasing Assistants have finally arrived for the multifamily industry. With so many to choose from it can be hard to figure out which i...

Alice Labs Pte. Ltd.

CMO's top 8 martech stories for the week - 6 May 2021

Read more

Nowadays, when everything is being done online, it is good to know that someone is trying to make an improvement. As a company, you are o...

Marcus

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

Blog Posts

Why if marketing is all you do, you’ll never be very good at it

OK, so you’re probably thinking: “Here comes another article to badger me about living in my bubble.” And also, “I bet this bubble-bashing piece will go on to explain how I can achieve better results through some heady dose of new life experiences, new routines and annoyingly different opinions on social media.”

Dane Smith and Toby Harrison

Ogilvy Australia

A leader’s role in rebuilding a culture of confidence

Every day, there are new predictions and studies on the future of work, the state of the economy and the unfolding global pandemic. All of which creates uncertainty and heightens the imperative of effective leadership.

Michelle Gibbings

Workplace expert, author

Confused About Your Customers?​

​I've worked in brand and marketing for more than 20 years. But there’s one area where I’ve found myself going around in circles and I must admit I'm becoming increasingly confused.

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in