New Guinness World Records book showcases innovative brand campaigns

Famous book of unusual and amazing world records now brings innovative brand record breaking campaigns to the fore

The latest Guinness World Records book has been released today and features six new Australian marketing campaigns from brands including Nutella, KMart, T20 World Cup 2020 and Australian Radio Network.

Guinness World Records, which started life in 1955 with a single book published from a room above a gym, now works with hundreds of global brands and businesses to create campaigns that are newsworthy and engaging. Along with the books, the Guinness stable now includes TV shows, social media and live events, along with its own in-house consultancy for brands and businesses to pitch their campaigns around the message of record-breaking. 

Nutella Australia working with the Kinetic Agency made a Guinness World Records title attempt for the longest line of pancakes in  February 2018. It was the culmination of its month-long 'Spread a little love' digital campaign which achieved a reach of 4.2 million. It included over 15,000 page visits to the Nutella ‘Spread Love’ website and 5215 social interactions.

The Brick Builder, Ben Craig, worked with John Cochrane Advertising and sponsors, Caravanning Queensland and Top Parks, to achieve the Guinness World Records title for the Largest LEGO brick caravan in September 2018.  In all, it took 288,630 individual bricks over five weeks to create the caravan.

The third campaign listed this year is T20 World Cup 2020, which worked with Australian wicket-keeper, Alyssa Healey, in February 2019 to achieve the Guinness World Records title for the highest catch of a cricket ball. After successfully catching the ball, released by a drone at 72.3 metres, the Australian international's final record stood at 82.5 metres. The record attempt was organised to mark one year until the start of the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup which begins on 21st February 2020.

The Largest dim sum (yum cha) meal, which consisted of 764 people, was achieved by radio station, WSFM, from the Australian Radio Network, with its presenters, Jonesy and Amanda, along with Channel 7 and the City of Sydney, during the 2019 Sydney Lunar Festival to mark the start of the Chinese Year of the Pig.

Kmart Australia in Queenstown, New Zealand attempted the most books toppled in domino fashion in one hour record, which saw 3000 dominoes topple at the KMart annual store managers’ conference in October 2018.

In July 2018, the largest nutbush dance, consisting of 1719 people, was achieved by Big Run Events with the Birdsville Big Red Bash and the Royal Flying Doctor Service to raise money for the service in Birdsville, Australia.

The global authority on record breaking said it wants to inspire people to engage with record-breaking – and maybe find out the answer to that original question.

“Securing a place in the Guinness World Records Book is a huge achievement for any brand, business or individual. The six new Australian business records showcased in this year’s book demonstrate just how versatile and impactful record-breaking can be," vice-president, creative consultancy EMEA and APAC, Guinness World Records, Neil Foster, said.

"We hope that these activations will inspire more brands to implement their own record-breaking campaigns."

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.     

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