Kmart launches new brand positioning, campaign

Retailer aims to put the customer at the heart of its strategy

With household budgets tightening, Kmart knew it needed to evolve its brand positioning and communicate it in a new way. 

This new positioning has led to the launch of its latest ‘Low prices for life’ campaign, which aims to put the customer at the centre of its strategy. Created in partnership with BWM Dentsu, the campaign highlights the retailers commitment to low-priced products, with a focus on celebrating the joy customers feel when engaging with the brand in their everyday lives. 

General manager of marketing at Kmart Australia, Laurie Lai, said with this campaign, Kmart wanted to celebrate the role lower priced products play in people’s lives. 

“We know household budgets are tight, so now is the right time strategically to renew our brand promise to provide the latest low-price products. We’re excited our new positioning will create more authentic, emotional connections with our customers,” she said. 

The new positioning has been crafted to execute throughout the customer purchase cycle, from broadcast and targeted channels, to owned Kmart communications assets and in-store. The brand campaign launched nationally on Sunday, 21 July and is integrated across TV, out-of-home, catalogue, radio, social, digital display, website and in-store. 

To complement the campaign, the iconic Australian retailer has introduced a new music track ‘Everlasting Love’ and partnered with Australian singer-songwriter, Pete Murray. 

“We’ve also evolved a few key distinctive assets such as relaxed, contemporary tone, branding design and music to ensure we are evolving our previous ‘winning formula’,” Lai told CMO. “Kmart’s ‘We make low prices irresistible’ proposition had carved out a highly distinctive, branded and adaptable platform over the years. But with household budgets tightening, we knew it was time for the Kmart brand – and, by extension, our brand expression – to evolve. 

“Now is the right time strategically to renew our brand promise to provide the latest low-price products. 

“The strength of ‘Low prices for life’ not only reinforces our price leadership, but lies in a simple emotional truth that people experience everyday with Kmart – it’s a little bit of daily moments of joy. The new positioning puts Kmart customers at the centre of our strategy and ‘Low prices for life’ demonstrates our continual commitment giving our customers the simple joy of great products for exceptionally low prices."

Along with the campaign, across social, Kmart will be encouraging customers and followers to get involved in low price for life to prove how far $20 can go at Kmart for kids playtime, dinner settings, outfit, mini beauty makeover and gifting. #Kmart20dollarlife aims to inspire customers with solutions to all those little life ‘problems’ that can be solved for under $20 at Kmart.  

Kmart will measure the impact ‘Low prices for life’ has on the Kmart brand by continuing to reinforce our Low Price Leadership and the success of Kmart date, as well as driving more customer transactions.  

Managing director at BWM Dentsu Melbourne, Belinda Murray, said it was time to communicate Kmart’s brand purpose in a fresh way. 

“With this campaign, we wanted to celebrate everything that Australians know and love about Kmart, while elevating the sense of joy that customers feel when Kmart products are integrated into their homes,”  she said.

The work is kept distinctively Kmart by leveraging the iconic K device, white background and logo while building on the brand’s signature music and celebration model. 

“From social through to broadcast, we have worked with Kmart to embrace an authentic and accessible style of storytelling, which we believe will be embraced by an Australian customer searching for trust. We applaud Kmart for showcasing their product against the backdrop of real life and see this as Kmart’s next milestone brand moment,” Murray said.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, follow our regular updates via CMO Australia's Linkedin company page, or join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia.  

 

 

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