Report: Status no longer defined by ownership

​The economy of ownership is over, Zuora says

The economy of ownership is over, with a new report showing more than two thirds of Australians have subscription services today.

The latest figures, which feature in a fresh survey undertaken by subscription software provider, Zuora, are up from 49 per cent just five years ago. The survey also found 75 per cent of Australian adults believe in the future people will subscribe to more services and own less physical 'stuff'.

Zuora recently surveyed more than 13,000 respondents from 12 countries around their subscription service habits and intentions. Australian respondents averaged 2.5 subscription services each, and nearly one-third said they expected to have more subscriptions in two years. About two-thirds (67 per cent) of adults also feel a person's status is no longer defined by what they own.

Respondents from China had the highest number of average subscription services (3.6) globally, followed by those from the US and Singapore, each on three.

Zuora vice-president and general manager of Asia-Pacific, Iman Ghodosi, said more than seven in 10 adults surveyed have subscription services, a substantial increase from five years ago.

“The economy is now being driven by a new consumer imperative that favours access over ownership, and vast sectors of the global economy are transforming themselves with pay-as-you-go subscription models built around the customer,” he said. “Commercial goods such as food, clothing and transportation are being re-imagined as utilities to leverage where and when needed, much like water, gas or electricity is consumed today.

“What we’re starting to witness is the end of ownership. People are subscribing to more because they’re getting the experience and outcome they’re looking for, without the burden of possessing things.”

Nearly three-quarters of Australian adults (73 per cent) said they would be willing to subscribe to a product or a service instead of owning it if they could get the same outcome for less money. About the same number believe that in the future people will own less physical ‘stuff’.

“We’re now seeing the subscription economy revolution really taking hold in Australia and New Zealand. It's a new way of thinking about products and consumption, and for businesses it’s about building ongoing relationships with your customers,” Ghodosi added.

“The co-founder and CEO of Zuora, Tien Tzuo, once summed it up like this: ‘The world is switching from capex to opex.’ We’re moving away from a system that asks us to buy and then continually replace products that are designed to fail.”

Two years from now, three in 10 Australian adults think they will have more subscriptions than they do now. Two in five think convenience in this biggest benefit to subscription services, followed by cost savings (37 per cent) and more variety (34 per cent).

The survey was conducted online by The Harris Poll on behalf of Zuora in October 2018 and involved 1040 Australian adults ages 18 and older.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu   

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

3 skills you need to drive better collaboration

A study published in The Harvard Business Review found the time spent in collaborative activities at work has increased by over 50 per cent in the past two decades. Larger projects; complicated problems; tighter timeframes: These require bigger teams with specialised skillsets and diverse backgrounds, often dispersed globally.

Jen Jackson

CEO, Everyday Massive

Better the bank you know?

In 2018, only 21 per cent of customers believed that banks in general had their customers best interests at heart and behave ethically. Only 26 per cent believed that banks will keep their promises; views cemented further following the Hayne Financial Services Royal Commission.

Carolyn Pitt

Head of account management, Hulsbosch

What 15 years of emotional intelligence told us about youth media audiences

Taking people on an emotional journey through content is the most critical part of being a publisher. Which is why emotion lies at the heart of VICE Media.

Stephanie Winkler

Head of insights, VICE Asia-Pacific

Еrоtiс photos and videos of sехuаl bеаutiеs оf yоur сity sее here ------> https://shr.name/BUgLRdsfjhsd jfhskjdhfjsdhfkjhsfdjksdf...

Julia Suzi

Isentia takes reputation analysis mainstream

Read more

Еrоtiс photos and videos of sехuаl bеаutiеs оf yоur сity sее here ------> https://shr.name/BUgLRsdfhsdkj fhksjdhf djfheowiruoiuweoirer...

Julia Suzi

5 fascinating facts about the CMO50 2019

Read more

Еrоtiс photos and videos of sехuаl bеаutiеs оf yоur сity sее here ------> https://shr.name/BUgLRtkjrh kjewhrjhwejrhweoioruoiurew...

Julia Suzi

How Aquila is rebranding for the casual bloke

Read more

Еrоtiс photos and videos of sехuаl bеаutiеs оf yоur сity sее here ------> https://shr.name/BUgLRdsfksdjf lkjsdlfjksdf

Julia Suzi

First pics: CMO50 2019 dinner - Slideshow - CMO Australia

Read more

https://www.google.com/sear...

Julia Suzi

CBA, NAB, Telstra sign on for AI ethics principles trial

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in