Australian Marketing Institute kicks off fresh tertiary accreditation program

Marketing professionals association endorsed 41 courses nationally to help craft the next generarion of marketing executives

The Australian Marketing Institute (AMI) says its revamped university accreditation and endorsement program is aimed at supporting tertiary marketing courses that better equip the next generation of marketers for the increasingly competitive corporate environment.

The accreditation program encompasses a vetting program of universities and vocational education and training provides nationally. To date, the professional industry association has accredited 41 marketing courses across 18 Australian universities with the accreditation, including Deakin Business School, University of Melbourne, University of South Australia, Griffith University, UTS Sydney, La Trobe University, Edith Cowan University and University of Southern Queensland.

According to the AMI, its accredited or endorsed marketing courses will enable students to develop more contemporary marketing thinking and concepts. These include the ability to formulate objective-based marketing strategies, hone problem solving skills and better implement theoretical knowledge.

Those who graduate from a program approved by the AMI are entitled to a credit reduction in time required to become a certified practising marketer.

Outgoing AMI CEO, Lee Tonitto, described the accreditation process as an opportunity to create a marketing industry benchmark and compared it to the pathway chartered accountants or certified practicing lawyers go through.

“The brightest and the best will go through the AMI accredited and endorsed programs, and participation will shape the formative stages of their marketing careers,” she said.

“Research shows universities and degrees aligned with a peak professional body are more attractive to students than no-accredited ones. I the case of international fee paying students, it is often the deciding factor in selecting one university over another.”

Head of marketing at Deakin Business School, professor Andre Bonfer, said the program signals to students and employers the high quality and rigour around its courses from an industry perspective. Deakin is offering courses in data-driven marketing, digital marketing, content marketing, creative marketing and customer experience, all endorsed by AMI.

“What’s more, it provides a value-add to our students as they have networking opportunities during their studies and can engage with the industry in multiple ways, including with mentorship programs.”

Also this week, the AMI confirmed a partnership with the US-based CMO Council, which it positioned as a way to offer international research, marketing intelligence and best practice insights to the 60,000 marketing practitioners working in Australia.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu 

 

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Cannes Part 1: Why brands must put human interactions at the heart of their business

As a Media Juror at this year’s Cannes Lions, I was fortunate enough to attend the world’s most influential festival of creativity and listen to thought-leading marketers from around the globe.

Nickie Scriven

CEO, Zenith

4 creative skills that will be useful forever

In recent times, the clarion call from futurists, economists, marketers, educators and leaders the world over is one of slight panic, “The world is changing and you’re not ready for it!” And of course, they make a very good point.

Kieran Flanagan and Dan Gregory

Speakers, trainers, co-authors

Why defining brand strategy is vital to capitalising on quick wins

Big brands were once protected from small brands by high barriers to entry. Big brands had the resources to employ big agencies, to crack big ideas and to invest in big campaigns. They had the luxury of time to debate strategies and work on long-term innovation pipelines. Retailers used to partner with big brands.

Troy McKinnna

Co-founder, Agents of Spring, Calm & Stormy

Being an investor who has an understanding of the finance industry, I would question the validity of this article, judging by the impairm...

Rowan

How a customer-led digital transformation has helped this CMO generate $6m in incremental business

Read more

An interesting update considering that today is the easiest way it has ever been to measure contribution to the business as well as the h...

Frederic

State of the CMO 2019: Tenure shortens, pressure is on as marketers strive to demonstrate impact

Read more

I thought this was what Salesforce Audience Studio (formerly Salesforce DMP) was supposed to do. How are a CDP and a DMP different? I'm c...

Tony Ahn

Salesforce announces customer data platform

Read more

Well written Vanessa!! Agreed with your view that human experience is marketing's next frontier. Those businesses who are focused on the ...

Clyde Griffith

Forget customer experience, human experience is marketing's next frontier

Read more

Great tips for tops skills need to develop and stay competitive

Nick

The top skills needed to stay competitive in a rapidly changing workforce

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in