ALDI tops most trusted Aussie brands list from Roy Morgan

German supermarket chain trumps its traditional local competitors in a list that also sees Qantas fall into fourth position

ALDI has come out trumps in a new list of Australia’s most trusted brands from Roy Morgan.

According to the research group’s latest Net Trust Score survey, ALDI came in just ahead of insurer, NRMA, with Bendigo Bank, Qantas and Bunnings rounding out the top five spots. This sees the Germany supermarket giant toppling Qantas from the top spot previously. Australian-owned supermarket competitors, Woolworths and Coles, also rated highly but did not make the top 10.

Rounding out the top 10 from sixth to tenth position are: Kmart, ABC, IGA, Australia Post and ING. The list is based on a multi-round survey of 4000 Australians asking them which brands they trust as well as those they distrust. The four survey rounds were conducted in October 2017, then January, February and April 2018. Questions were unprompted and open ended.

To get the final figures, Roy Morgan subtracted the distrust score of each brand from its trusted score.

Despite ALDI’s strong position and IGA’s appearance in the top 10, Roy Morgan said supermarkets as a category have a minus Net Trust Score (NTS), and were trailing behind industries such as automotive, consumer product brands, travel and technology.

“The success of ALDI’s entrance to the Australian market has been built not only on discount prices but also a reputation for reliability and meeting the needs of consumers,” Roy Morgan CEO, Michele Levine, said, adding that nowhere is trust in a brand so important as the foods we eat.

“ALDI’s ability to excel at its core competencies has built a level of trust in the Australian market without at the same time attracting the degree of distrust seen by its rivals.”

Levine said Woolworths and Coles, along with new entrants such as Amazon Fresh, Costco and Kaufland, will need to work harder to reduce the levels of distrust in their brands.  

“Although ALDI’s larger rivals both have high levels of trust, it is the number of Australians who express distrust in the two market leaders that they should be worried about,” she added.  

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

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