RXP and The Works debut new content strategy agency

ASX-listed digital services group launches fresh content marketing offering following closure of iSentia's King Content business

The Daresay team
The Daresay team

Digital service consultancy, RXP and its creative agency subsidiary, The Works, have launched a new content and production group after picking up clients and staff off the back of King Content's closure.

The ASX-listed company struck an agreement with iSentia following the closure of its strategy and content division at the end 2017 to take on a number of existing clients, as well as four senior staff members, including general manager, Ruth Haffenden, and senior content strategist, Yanni Kyriacos.

The result is Daresay, an agency offering strategic planning, creative production, design, animation, editorial and analytics. Haffenden leads the group as head of strategy and content, joined by Rachel Solomon has head of broadcast and content.

RXP CEO, Ross Fielding, said it had launched Daresay in collaboration with The Works in response to growing demand for integrated content production. RXP acquired The Works in a deal worth up to $33 million last August.

“RXP already works with tier-one businesses on building their online and digital capabilities and we see a number of opportunities for Daresay to play a significant role with this, in addition to working with other partners on enhancing their content marketing,” Fielding stated.

Clients on Daresay’s books include Optus, Rentokil, Masterpet, Brother, Intuit and Primo Small Goods.

“Strategically led content, created efficiently, which delivers results for clients are the driving principles behind the creation of daresay,” Haffenden said. “With a highly experience team of content creators, in-house production capabilities and the backing of RXP and The Works, we have built a formidable proposition that I’m excited to be part of.”

iSentia closed King Content last August after experiencing declining revenues and profits, restructuring in what it claimed was an attempt to build longer-term contracts around strategy and ongoing content builds.

The group exited the content marketing business by the end of the year, reporting an $11.9 million after-tax loss as a result.

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