AMP, Starlight speak about transformation journey: Salesforce World Tour

Continuous innovation keys to delivering seamless customer experiences

Craig Ryman of AMP speaking at Salesforce World Tour
Craig Ryman of AMP speaking at Salesforce World Tour

Continuous innovation in business is the “critical path” to deliver a seamless and effortless customer journey, according to AMP group executive, technology and operations, Craig Ryman.

“Innovation is the critical part,” Ryman said, speaking to a packed crowd at Salesforce 2018 World Tour about the company’s customer-led journey.

“If you’re going to deliver great customer experiences, they are not going to be standing still or upgrading slow. Year-on-year their expectations of what great is goes up - and so continuous innovation is really important to us.”

Ryman said the company has committed to a 'trailblazer' philosophy that focuses on continuous innovation.

“We have a bold vision - and to bring that vision to life you need a bit of courage in the way you execute. It is really important for us to deliver a seamless, effortless experience for our customers,” he said.

Ryman said in order for AMP to “reshape the organisation” and deliver a seamless experience to customers, it had to replatform all of its channels by migrating about 40 to 50 systems onto the one Salesforce platform. The ambition is to maintain a more simplified, efficient, agile and innovative platform.

Related: AMP CEO highlights customer-led technology investments in solid financial result

“The value for AMP is that it creates the glue that makes the connectivity of all of those different channels and ensures the customer gets a seamless and consistent experience, however they want to deal with us,” he said. 

AMP has 11,000 advisers interacting with AMP on a day-to-day basis.

“What we are seeking to do is make them more productive so they can spend time servicing their customers, rather than doing complex tasks and helping them grow their business through new capabilities such as artificial intelligence and better sales management capabilities,” Ryman explained.

The goal is to go full circle - draw on AMP’s strong customer service heritage - and find the intimacy in the customer relationship. The company recognises it is not just competing again the next financial services provider, but competing with the big tech companies that have completely redesigned their customer experience.  

Salesforce executive vice-president, product and solutions marketing, Stephanie Buscemi said companies like AMP act as a good example for how to transform an organisation to meet modern customer expectations.

“We are all disruptors. We are all leaders in our business. We are all agents of change for our personal self, professionally and for our community,” she told attendees.

In saying that, the successful brands during this fourth industrial revolution will be the ones delivering a connected experience, she noted.

"It is a crazy time and at the centre of it is technology. We’ve seen throughout history that technology is at the heart of innovation,” Buscemi said.

Nanocomputing, robotics, AI, autonomous vehicles, for example, are the path forward. “It means all of us live in this connected world. All of these devices and things are connected and they are connected with all of you.”

Buscemi pointed to Coca-Cola, which has taken a simple cooler and transformed the consumer experience by using Salesforce's Einstein artificial intelligence capabilities.

“When people go in, they know exactly which things, which product, people are selecting and they are able to automatically update their inventory. Gone are the days of clipboards and pens and technicians looking and checking that,” she said.

But the reality is many businesses are not able to deliver a connected customer experience. “We talk about it in the form of a customer crisis. . . I hear repeatedly, ‘do we have the capability to create these connected experiences?’’

According to Salesforce research, 59 per cent of surveyed companies don’t have those capabilities today. “That has got to change,” Buscemi said.

“This isn’t just about technology. This isn’t just about product. This is about changing the world and making the world a better place... We live in uncertain times so companies have to step up their game and be part of change.”

Related: Salesforce looks to democratise AI, IoT with latest customisable platform play

One organisation striving for a more connected customer experience - and making the community a better place - is the Starlight Foundation. CEO, Louise Baxter, said the children’s charity wants to be technologically savvy, agile, smart and mobile in order to put “the human back in what we do.”

Read more: How Starlight Foundation is enacting digital transformation – for good

“The one thing we all want for our children is to be healthy and happy. For seriously ill children, that is taken away from them overnight. What we do at Starlight is positively disrupt this challenging time by putting the fun and play back into children’s lives. That delivers positive health outcomes," she said during the Salesforce World Tour event.

“We all know whatever we were doing yesterday is not what we need to do tomorrow in order to get where we need to go. We know things are changing at such a fast pace, we need to be seeking out change, because of that change and disruption, and embracing opportunity that it holds.”

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu


Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

It's an interesting direction, and fair play that they've backed what their service differentiator in the market is. It's a bit clunky bi...

Jeff

Versa launches bot-activated website

Read more

Algorithms that can make sense of unstructured data is the future. It's great to see experts in the field getting together to discuss AI.

Sumit Takim

In pictures: Harnessing AI for customer engagement - CMO roundtable Melbourne

Read more

Real digital transformation requires reshaping the way the business create value for customers. Achieving this requires that organization...

ravi H

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

thanks

Lillian Juliet

How Winedirect has lifted customer recency, frequency and value with a digital overhaul

Read more

Having an effective Point of Sale system implemented in your retail store can streamline the transactions and data management activities....

Sheetal Kamble

​Jurlique’s move to mobile POS set to enhance customer experience

Read more

Blog Posts

Brand storytelling lessons from Singapore’s iconic Fullerton hotel

In early 2020, I had the pleasure of staying at the newly opened Fullerton Hotel in Sydney. It was on this trip I first became aware of the Fullerton’s commitment to brand storytelling.

Gabrielle Dolan

Business storytelling leader

You’re doing it wrong: Emotion doesn’t mean emotional

If you’ve been around advertising long enough, you’ve probably seen (or written) a slide which says: “They won’t remember what you say, they’ll remember how you made them feel.” But it’s wrong. Our understanding of how emotion is used in advertising has been ill informed and poorly applied.

Zac Martin

Senior planner, Ogilvy Melbourne

Why does brand execution often kill creativity?

The launch of a new brand, or indeed a rebrand, is a transformation to be greeted with fanfare. So why is it that once the brand has launched, the brand execution phase can also be the moment at which you kill its creativity?

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in