Report: Aussie marketing jobs tally set to skyrocket in next five years

RMIT and Deloitte Access Economics report shows the impact digital marketing and data analytics are having on the marketing professional and roles available

Australia’s marketing workforce is expected to grow by more than 11 per cent, or 30,000 jobs, in the next five years thanks to increased integration of marketing with other business functions and the growth of digital marketing.

That’s the latest finding from RMIT University’s The Future of Work: Occupational and education trends in marketing in Australia report, prepared by Deloitte Access Economics.

The paper reported growth of 2.2 per cent a year is expected in marketing roles between 2016-2017 and 2021-2022, markedly higher than the 1.5 per cent predicted across the overall Australian labour force during the same timeframe.

In addition, post-graduate qualified marketing professions are expected to see their pay cheques go up by an average of 14 per cent to $150,000 over the next five years thanks to growing demand. The current average income of marketers with a post-graduate qualification in management and commerce is $129,000.

Across the split of 269,000 roles currently in existence, advertising and sales managers represent 141,200, and are expected to rise by 1.7 per cent in the next five years. But it’s advertising and marketing professionals that are expected to have the higher average annual growth rate at 3.2 per cent, lifting from 62,300 currently to 73,000 by 2021-2022.

Technical sales representatives are also predicted to increase by 1.9 per cent to 32,400 roles by 2021-2022, and public relations professionals by 2.4 per cent to 24,700 over the same period.

Commenting on the findings, RMIT program director of post-graduate marketing programs, Dr Foula Kopanidis, said it’s clear marketing occupations are experiencing change due to the growth of digital marketing and data analytics. Yet she warned against playing down the importance of the creative skillset required for modern marketers.

“I see these technological developments are providing new options and outlets for companies to perform the tasks that have underpinned the role of the marketer, such as connecting with customers and targeting products to relevant markets,” she said.

“Although technical digital skills are becoming increasingly important, the core mix of technical and creative skills underpinning marketing roles is still critical for success in the job market. This creative aspect of marketing, in particular, is seen as a factor which is required to ensure that a product or brand is successful in the market, and the human element associated with this creative flair can be difficult to be substituted with technology.”

Dr Kopanidis noted demand from across industries for market research and advice also means workers need to combine marketing expertise with specialist industry knowledge.

“Individuals with work experience or undergraduate qualifications in other areas such as architecture, engineering and nursing can also find that the multi-disciplinary skills that are attained through further study in marketing can assist them in pivoting towards a marketing or sales-related role within their chosen industry,” she said.

Deloitte partner, David Rumbens, agreed marketers will need to be savvy across all business functions and upskill to attain a combined skillset of marketing expertise and specialist industry knowledge.

“Businesses expect works to bring multi-dimensional skills to a marketing-related role, such as in relation to communication, critical thinking and teamwork, as well as in analytics, automation and integrating marketing and technology platforms,” he said.

Artificial intelligence and data analytics are key drivers of this change and need for new skillsets, Rumbens added.

The Future of Work: Occupational and education trends in Marketing in Australia report was based on the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations list of jobs in the marketing sphere.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

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