Why technology, training and content go hand-in-hand in Jetstar’s marketing transformation

Jetstar's chief marketing officer talks to CMO about the airline's digital marketing transformation, investment into a new martech stack, and why training is vital


Tackling complexity

Treating every customer as an individual, by giving them what they want when they want it, raises interesting questions about traditional segmentation versus optimisation, Wade said.

“What we’re trying to balance now is how the transition between traditional segments most business use, such as key attitudinal or age group, and to a personalised level,” he said. “At the moment, we’re blending. Some programs run based on traditional segmentation, some run on a personalised methodology based on multivariate, A/B testing and optimisation.

“As we go forward, our vision is everything will become personalised. But that journey requires us to go further than a DMP and to dynamic creative optimisation as well as personalisation of product. As an organisation, it’s one of our major strategic thrusts, but we’re not fully developed yet.”  

What helps is that most customers transact through the Jetstar.com website. “Every journey from the start is unique - people travel with different people, have different baggage requirements, food on the plane, and so on. The real challenge is how we use that information or content in what we do,” Wade said.

“We can use that as a signal, but it needs to be balanced against the complexity of doing something. That’s the continual journey every marketing organisation faces at the moment.”  

Content’s role in engagement

Wade said marketing personalisation is one of seven core programs of transformation. Another is to lead in the content revolution.

Jetstar has established a cross-functional working group to focus on content needs based around three customer lifecycle phases: To help customers make decisions; to serve customers once they’ve made a decision; and to encourage them to advocate for the organisation. That working team sits separately to the marketing function, with the two interacting on a weekly and monthly basis.

“You can’t just improve the tech stack, you have to improve your content stream as well,” Wade said. “It’s the second part of training: To become storytellers instead of traditional, shouting marketers. That journey has to go together, and it’s an exciting one for us across multiple languages, geographies and customer groups.”  

Meanwhile, the marketing team’s overarching strategic priority is how to use new insights to put the customer first across the wider business.

“Last year, not only did we set up lots of technological change, we also set up everything from customer panels to new brand tracking to give us new indicators of customer satisfaction,” Wade said. “We also changed the way we do NPS surveys of those who have flown.

“We have an extremely rich pool of data. The challenge now is to manage that data and make sure we put the customer at the heart of decisions we make, and a way that’s manageable.”

Already, marketing has established quarterly surveys and feedback loops to encourage dialogue across functions.

“It’s an exciting problem to have – we have to now work through how we make that meaningful  to ensure we make informed customer decisions in a digital age,” Wade said.  

Through of all this change, Wade said he was pleased to have a strategic partner in Oracle.

“This would not have been capable without the technology stack or their people,” he added. “Different companies will find different people to partner with. For us, we found a partner we trust believe in and has helped us deliver.”  

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