Solotel taps Dan Lacaze as first group marketing director

Lacaze will build digital, customer and marketing capability across portfolio of 30 brands

Australian hospitality and entertainment group, Solotel, has crowned Dan Lacaze as its first group marketing director, a role that invites him to the executive leadership table.

Formerly, Lacaze was BMF client services director, where he managed a department of 28 people, new business and key accounts including Aldi, Sportsbet, The Hyundai A-League, Weight Watchers, Bpay, TAL, Tip Top, Meat & Livestock Australia, and The Australian Federal Government. New business wins included Sportsbet, Dulux Group (Dulux, Yates, Hortico), James Squire and 5 Seeds cider.

He said successful projects included the Sportsbet 'Roid in Android campaign, which featured Ben Johnson covered by news publications globally, sparking "outrage" locally and entertaining punters all over the world. Additionally, the A-League 'You've Gotta Have a Team' campaign broke all broadcast, attendance and membership records for the league.

Speaking to CMO at the time, Lacaze said the campaign captured 238 million earned media impressions, and was about harnessing the power of people’s love for their clubs.

“The idea was we wanted to find one of these kids that played football, but didn’t have an A-League team, and get the 10 clubs to pitch to this kid why; why should he, or she, choose their club,” he told CMO. “The line we came up with, ‘You've Gotta Have a team,’ was brilliant because it worked at a club level, at a league level, and it was also a colloquial phrase you hear across multiple sports.”

Dan Lacaze
Dan Lacaze

Lacaze was an integral part of BMF’s efforts to push out a non-traditional digital marketing campaign that aimed to make real connections with desired fans - particularly kids and young males - to support the Hyundai A-League.

In his new role at Solotel, Lacaze will be responsible for building digital, customer and marketing capability across the portfolio of 30 brands - including bar, pub, bistro and restaurants  - across Sydney and Brisbane.

In 2016, Solotel merged with five Matt Moran restaurants and an events business. The partnership made Solotel the most diverse hospitality group in Australia.

Venues include Moran’s signature Aria and Chiswick restaurants, plus North Bondi Fish, Chophouse, Opera Bar, Riverbar, The Marlborough Hotel, Paddo Inn Bar & Grill, The Clock, Goros, The Sheaf, The Bank; and recently acquired Clovelly Hotel.

“I’m really excited about this new opportunity as I believe Solotel are fundamentally in the entertainment business. When I met owners Matt Moran and Bruce Solomon, I was struck by their warmth, passion, and entrepreneurialism. I’m thrilled to be given this opportunity to steward their portfolio of wonderfully iconic brands,” Lacaze said in a statement.

Solotel chief operating officer, Justine Baker, said the company is proud of the diversity of its people, and Lacaze adds a “unique new creative flavour” to the mix.

“We made a decision to upskill our team, and re-focus on our customers. We’re really looking forward to Dan joining the family at such an exciting time.”

This year, Solotel is rolling out a number of projects including the launch of a freestanding, three storey entertainment venue in Barangaroo, which will house a new bar, Matt Moran restaurant and rooftop cocktail lounge

It also plans to unveil a two-storey pub and café in a heritage listed Queenslander in South Bank, Brisbane, as well as shake-up the Events by Aria business, which currently manages events at the Sydney Opera House and the Art Gallery of NSW.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

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