Eventbrite and Facebook team up to hatch ticket buying facility

Tool transforms how consumers buy tickets to sports, food, business and music events

Eventbrite's Phil Silverstone
Eventbrite's Phil Silverstone

Eventbrite and Facebook have taken the wrappers off a new event discovery and ticket buying facility in Australia, which lets users buy tickets directly within Facebook without having to leave the site or app.

Eventbrite Australia general manager, Phil Silverstone, said the partnership is the first of its kind in Australia and that Eventbrite is the only Facebook partner allowing attendees to purchase and access their ticket completely within the social network. 

“Facebook’s apps are some of the most-used in the world, and meeting consumers where they are already spending a significant amount of their time online is vital for providing a seamless user experience,” Silverstone said in a statement.

“By introducing a distributed commerce model into Australia’s ticketing landscape, Eventbrite is marking a line in the sand that signals a fundamental shift in the industry. We’re bringing an openness to the market that puts the customer at its core: We’re helping event organisers sell more tickets by making them available to purchase where their audiences already are.”

Facebook events ticketing product manager, Yoav Zeevi, said the company’s primary focus is to make selling tickets easier for its partners like Eventbrite.

“We’ve had great feedback from our partners that posting on Facebook helps them drive sales and attendance,” he said.

A similar integration move has already been rolled out in the US. According to the social media giant, results from the partnership show events published through organisers’ Facebook pages are seeing two times more ticket sales and registrations than events redirected out of Facebook to a ticketing page. 

Head of investment at media agency Maxus, Ricky Chanana, praised the Facebook and Eventbrite integration. 

“This is a strategic and clever partnership, particularly for Eventbrite,” he said. “Most consumers expect brands to provide 'click to purchase' opportunities in this day and age, especially when they are providing layers of personal data on a daily basis such as interests, check-ins, hobbies, and brand interactions."   With that in mind, Chanana said giving the consumer fewer hoops to jump through when buying a ticket — doing away with multiple pages, new windows and forms to fill in — means people are far less likely to abandon their order, reducing drop-off.  

“Looking at this partnership from a human behaviour lens, the four key ingredients needed to land a successful event are a) your top friends b) the event location c) event date/calendar d) event reminder. Facebook ticks all of these boxes at scale,” he told CMO.  

In related news, Eventbrite has also hatched a new global integration with Spotify, which will see the music streaming app recommend Eventbrite events to its 100 million listeners based on their music preferences and alongside their favourite artists and albums.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu      

 

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