Samsung apologizes for the exploding Note7 with a full-page ad

The mea culpa pledges that the company will learn from the incident and get to the very bottom of why it happened.

In an effort to show full contrition for the Note7 debacle, Samsung took out a full-page ad in three newspapers Tuesday to apologize.

The ad appeared in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and The Washington Post. The letter is attributed to Gregory Lee, the president and CEO of Samsung Electronics North America.

note7 ad Rurik Bradbury

Samsung is really sorry that its phones are blowing up.

In the ad, Lee says the company will do everything it can to make amends and find out why the phone shipped with such a dangerous flaw:

“An important tenet of our mission is to offer best-in-class safety and quality. Recently, we fell short on this promise. For this we are truly sorry. We will re-examine every aspect of the device, including all hardware, software, manufacturing and the overall battery structure. We will move as quickly as possible, but will take the time needed to get the right answers.”

In October Samsung killed off the Note7 and asked all customers to return their device for reimbursement. The letter also references the recent recall of Samsung top-loading washing machines.

With two major recalls in one year, Samsung clearly feels the need to try and win back consumer trust.

“Most importantly, safety remains our top priority,” the ad says. “We are grateful for your ongoing support and again, we are truly sorry.”

Full-page ads are quite the revenue stream for the newspaper industry. Recently Slack took out a snarky full-page ad when Microsoft launched its competitor, Microsoft Teams.

The story behind the story: Samsung is already looking ahead to the Galaxy S8, this week confirming that it will include an artificial intelligence powered digital assistant. It has us thinking that Samsung may double down on its previous strategy of pushing consumers into its own services and overpowering the phone with software choices. In the era where a Google-powered Pixel is on the shelf, it’s a tenuous strategy.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

More Videos

Well done, team at Larsen. Fantastic story of how to continually invest in customer experience.

Adam Frank

A designer jewellery brand's take on customer relations

Read more

Great piece Katja. It will be fascinating to see how the shift in people's perception of value will affect design, products and services ...

Paul Scott

How to design for a speculative future - Customer Design - CMO Australia

Read more

Google collects as much data as it can about you. It would be foolish to believe Google cares about your privacy. I did cut off Google fr...

Phil Davis

ACCC launches fresh legal challenge against Google's consumer data practices for advertising

Read more

“This new logo has been noticed and it replaces a logo no one really knew existed so I’d say it’s abided by the ‘rule’ of brand equity - ...

Lawrence

Brand Australia misses the mark

Read more

IMHO a logo that needs to be explained really doesn't achieve it's purpose.I admit coming to the debate a little late, but has anyone els...

JV_at_lAttitude_in_Cairns

Brand Australia misses the mark

Read more

Blog Posts

Why marketing technology utilisation is taking on new urgency

Disparate data sources, fragmented technology and a lack of funding has left many brands struggling in the battle for online customer attention amid a global pandemic. Now more than ever, brands need to focus on unlocking the value of their marketing technology.

Suzanne Croxford

Marketing technology partner, Wunderman Thompson Australia

How to design for a speculative future

For a while now, I have been following a fabulous design strategy and research colleague, Tatiana Toutikian, a speculative designer. This is someone specialising in calling out near future phenomena, what the various aspects of our future will be, and how the design we create will support it.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

The obvious reason Covidsafe failed to get majority takeup

Online identity is a hot topic as more consumers are waking up to how their data is being used. So what does the marketing industry need to do to avoid a complete loss of public trust, in instances such as the COVID-19 tracing app?

Dan Richardson

Head of data, Verizon Media

Sign in