Shingy: Reflect culture back to consumers through your brand content and experiences

Digital prophet, David Shing, talks about the need for focus on culture, code and creativity in modern marketing approach

David Shing at the Reset conference.
Photo Credit: Alexander Mayes Photography
David Shing at the Reset conference. Photo Credit: Alexander Mayes Photography

It’s the brands that can reflect culture back to consumers through their content, brand proposition and creative experiences that are going to win, according to AOL digital prophet, David Shing.

Speaking at today’s AANA Reset conference in Sydney, the digital and advertising industry commentator and futurist said the challenge for brands is to reflect the cultural values and contexts consumers are experiencing back to them in order to build relevancy and authenticity. He put forward three key ‘Cs’ to do this: Culture, the code and creativity.

“If you understand human needs, you’re going to be way ahead of the curve,” he told attendees. “The trick is understanding that technology might be changing the way we do things, but it isn’t changing our needs. We’re humans - our needs are wrapped up in the culture of where we are and you can never change it.”

As examples of products that didn’t stick to culture and failed or were superseded as a result, Shingy pointed to the Sony Walkman and Google Glass.

“Culture, code and creativity all need to be combined together,” Shingy said. “If you overindex on code and forget about culture, you end up with no friends.”

As emerging technologies such as augmented, virtual and mixed reality, drones, the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence come to fruition, it’s important for marketers to frame each in the context of the conversation and engagement consumers want to have, he continued.

Shingy also pointed to a shift from awareness to advocacy, noting 70 per cent of consumers would rather read about a brand than be advertised to. In response, he advised focusing on storytelling, but in particular, the story over the telling. These experiences also don’t need to be literal, they can be latent. Importantly, they should be shareable and reflect the growing “community of conversation”, he said.

To help, Shingy outlined a next-generation ‘4Ps’ of marketing required to meet the needs of millennials and next generation consumers: Platform, partnerships, pedigree and performance.

Shingy also stressed the importance of uniting the digital and physical experiences, noting that “currency is just currency to a consumer”. “Whether it’s board games or online gaming with a controller, they’re all games. Or if you think about images, it doesn’t matter if it’s on Snapchat or a billboard, it’s all imaging and context. There is no translation anymore,” he said.

“What is different is that they’re not just consuming content – those days are dead and buried. They are creators and curators of experiences. .. You have to deal with these cats, these are the next generation of adults.

“Personal expression is the new form of entertainment. And as more stuff comes to you, you have to think about how you reconcile that.”

Shingy also advised marketers to analyse what consumers are doing, their habits, identifying the things they find interesting and where your brand can help.“It’s about driving the why – we don’t think enough about the why, we’ve got how and why, but we have to ask about the why,” he added.

Shingy suggested innovation is out, and the focus now must be invention. “Invention is about creation, and that’s the opportunity for you in the marketplace,” he said.

Experimentation is a vital part of this process. “Not everything works, that’s the thing about experimentation,” he said. “To do that, you need to think about reframing then find the right people and authenticity of influencers, build authenticity.

“You do need to fall forward – not everything can win.”

The theme of brands as part of the fabric of popular culture was echoed by Unruly founder and CEO, Sarah Wood, who took to the stage during the Reset conference.

“Have the courage to commission purposeful brand messages and campaigns that change the way people feel about themselves, and that address real people. Then we don’t have to worry about the future, we can just help shape a future we can be proud of,” she said.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+:google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Launch marketing council Episode 5: Retailer and supplier

In our fifth and final episode, we delve into the relationship between retailer and supplier and how it drives and influences launch marketing strategies and success. To do that, we’re joined by Campbell Davies, group general manager of Associated Retailers Limited, and Kristin Viccars, marketing director A/NZ, Apex Tool Group. Also featured are Five by Five Global managing director, Matt Lawton, and CMO’s Nadia Cameron.

More Videos

Great read. I agree that it should be a perfect balance between interacting with your customers and knowing your brand. As a business, yo...

Caroline Scott

7 ways CMOs can improve their customer engagement game

Read more

Very true. Team development helps improve collaboration among the team members. I was able to improve my team's collaboration skills by t...

Quent Sinder

Why empowering others can help make you a great leader

Read more

CRM is a very good software that can help you succeed in your business. In my company, this system has allowed me to improve customer rel...

Anna Janicka

Sensis rebrands to Thryv and brings business software to Australian SMBs

Read more

AI Leasing Assistants have finally arrived for the multifamily industry. With so many to choose from it can be hard to figure out which i...

Alice Labs Pte. Ltd.

CMO's top 8 martech stories for the week - 6 May 2021

Read more

Nowadays, when everything is being done online, it is good to know that someone is trying to make an improvement. As a company, you are o...

Marcus

10 lessons Telstra has learnt through its T22 transformation

Read more

Blog Posts

Why if marketing is all you do, you’ll never be very good at it

OK, so you’re probably thinking: “Here comes another article to badger me about living in my bubble.” And also, “I bet this bubble-bashing piece will go on to explain how I can achieve better results through some heady dose of new life experiences, new routines and annoyingly different opinions on social media.”

Dane Smith

Behavioural science lead and regional consulting partner, Ogilvy

A leader’s role in rebuilding a culture of confidence

Every day, there are new predictions and studies on the future of work, the state of the economy and the unfolding global pandemic. All of which creates uncertainty and heightens the imperative of effective leadership.

Michelle Gibbings

Workplace expert, author

Confused About Your Customers?​

​I've worked in brand and marketing for more than 20 years. But there’s one area where I’ve found myself going around in circles and I must admit I'm becoming increasingly confused.

Rich Curtis

CEO, FutureBrand A/NZ

Sign in