Exponential: Brands need to respect consumer journey and control in mobile advertising

Exponential mobile chief says brands need to show consumers more respect with mobile advertising and take advantage of the more native functionality of mobile devices

Building better mobile advertising experiences comes down to understanding the consumer journey, being contextually relevant, and respecting their ability to opt in and out of engagement.

That’s the view of Exponential head of mobile for APAC and South Africa, Nicole Liebmann, who presented on how to optimise mobile advertising at the vendor’s recent customer breakfast event in Sydney.

Liebmann said brands were not doing enough to maximise on the rise of smartphone and tablet usage, and identified four key elements that should sit at the heart of a clear mobile strategy. The first is understanding the consumer journey.

“Mobile usage is highly fragmented, and session times are very low,” she told attendees. “There is a much more limited communications window. You need to build native advertising and engagement that’s direct and useful, can be consumed quickly and easily, and that has very strong calls to action and the right terminology for a mobile environment.”

With so many targeting variables available to marketers today, from location to time, behavioural data and topic, Liebmann said there were ample ways to be more contextually relevant. As an example, she pointed to a recent McDonalds mobile campaign, which used geofencing to target ads to consumers within close proximity to one of its physical restaurants. Using a burger icon and mapping technology, consumers were shown the direction to the restaurant, as well as provided with the distance and directions.

Even more important is the need to show respect and give control to consumers in a mobile context, Liebmann said. With hundreds of millions of consumers now using adblocking technology, it’s vital mobile advertising has an element of opt-in engagement, she said.

“This is one we don’t adhere to the most in the market today,” she claimed. “This can result in consumers proactively ignoring your ads and result in adblocking. And that means consumers turn off the ‘good’ as well as the ‘bad’ ads.”

Liebmann noted that in recent AdBlock research, 51 per cent of respondents were using blockers to control their user experience.

“It’s about using functionality that allows them to control that experience,” she said, highlighting ads that block content or don’t feature close buttons as core culprits in the rising adblocking trend.

A third suggestion from Liebmann was to embrace rich media in combination with native elements and functionality that exists within a mobile platform, such as swipe, tap, touch and shake. She claimed averages across mobile campaigns produced by Exponential in the last 12 months that used rich media saw clickthrough rates of 3.05 per cent, significantly higher than the 0.35 per cent market average.

“This allows consumers to move through ad experiences in a more organic way,” she commented. “We also aren’t taking advantage enough of the fact that consumers are directly touching our ad units. That allows a more emotional bond.”

And it’s clear brands need to better tailor their content and activity to the mobile environment if they want to be relevant, Liebmann said. “This is vital to ensure we deliver value to the consumer,” she said.

Asked if the onus for building better mobile experiences sits with brand owners or the publishers, Liebmann said both sides have a responsibility for improving the way advertising is done across these highly personal devices.

“A lot of the pressure is sitting with the advertisers, but publishers need to take ownership of this as well. They need to be building ad units and formats that aren’t intrusive and that do have the consumer and advertiser’s best interest at heart,” she said. “But it is a big chicken and egg. Sometimes, advertisers want those standout units and if the publisher goes back and says ‘we have this other ad unit that isn’t as intrusive’, the advertisers potentially just go to another publisher. So publishers will revert back to those more intrusive units to get that revenue.

“We need to be conscious of it though on both sides.”

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

Great content and well explained. Everything you need to know about Digital Design, this article has got you covered. You may also check ...

Ryota Miyagi

Why the art of human-centred design has become a vital CX tool

Read more

Interested in virtual events? If you are looking for an amazing virtual booth, this is definitely worth checking https://virtualbooth.ad...

Cecille Pabon

Report: Covid effect sees digital events on the rise long-term

Read more

Thank you so much for sharing such an informative article. It’s really impressive.Click Here & Create Status and share with family

Sanwataram

Predictions: 14 digital marketing predictions for 2021

Read more

Nice!https://www.live-radio-onli...

OmiljeniRadio RadioStanice Uzi

Google+ and Blogger cozy up with new comment system

Read more

Awesome and well written article. The examples and elements are good and valuable for all brand identity designs. Speaking of awesome, ch...

Ryota Miyagi

Why customer trust is more vital to brand survival than it's ever been

Read more

Blog Posts

A Brand for social justice

In 2020, brands did something they’d never done before: They spoke up about race.

Dipanjan Chatterjee and Xiaofeng Wang

VP and principal analyst and senior analyst, Forrester

Determining our Humanity

‘Business as unusual’ is a term my organisation has adopted to describe the professional aftermath of COVID-19 and the rest of the tragic events this year. Social distancing, perspex screens at counters and masks in all manner of situations have introduced us to a world we were never familiar with. But, as we keep being reminded, this is the new normal. This is the world we created. Yet we also have the opportunity to create something else.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Should your business go back to the future?

In times of uncertainty, people gravitate towards the familiar. How can businesses capitalise on this to overcome the recessionary conditions brought on by COVID? Craig Flanders explains.

Craig Flanders

CEO, Spinach

Sign in