Google will stop accepting new Flash ads on June 30

The company is pushing its advertisers onto HTML 5

Google has just hammered another nail in the coffin for Flash, Adobe Systems' multimedia software widely criticized for its frequent security vulnerabilities.

On Tuesday, Google set deadlines for when it will stop running Flash ads and accept only those written in HTML5, the latest version of the Web's mother tongue.

As of June 30, Google will stop accepting new Flash-based display ads for AdWords and DoubleClick Digital Marketing. And Flash ads won't be allowed on the company's Display Network or DoubleClick after Jan. 2, 2017.

Flash is one of the most commonly targeted applications by hackers because it's installed on hundreds of millions of computers. Unpatched vulnerabilities can allow a hacker to install malicious software on a computer if a victim merely views a malicious ad.

Attackers also use social engineering to trick people into thinking their Flash program needs updating, and then deliver malicious downloads.

Apple founder Steve Jobs was among the first to take on Flash, forbidding it to run on the iPhone.

Last year, Facebook's chief security officer called on Adobe to retire Flash. Then in September, Google stopped automatically playing some Flash content on Web pages.

Adobe acknowledged in December that HTML5 was the future, saying it had developed a tool called Animate CC for developing HTML5 content. The tool still allows the creation of Flash content as well, though.

Join the newsletter!

Or

Sign up to gain exclusive access to email subscriptions, event invitations, competitions, giveaways, and much more.

Membership is free, and your security and privacy remain protected. View our privacy policy before signing up.

Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Latest Videos

Conversations over a cuppa with CMO: Microsoft's Pip Arthur

​In this latest episode of our conversations over a cuppa with CMO, we catch up with the delightful Pip Arthur, Microsoft Australia's chief marketing officer and communications director, to talk about thinking differently, delivering on B2B connection in the crisis, brand purpose and marketing transformation.

More Videos

Blog Posts

A Brand for social justice

In 2020, brands did something they’d never done before: They spoke up about race.

Dipanjan Chatterjee and Xiaofeng Wang

VP and principal analyst and senior analyst, Forrester

Determining our Humanity

‘Business as unusual’ is a term my organisation has adopted to describe the professional aftermath of COVID-19 and the rest of the tragic events this year. Social distancing, perspex screens at counters and masks in all manner of situations have introduced us to a world we were never familiar with. But, as we keep being reminded, this is the new normal. This is the world we created. Yet we also have the opportunity to create something else.

Katja Forbes

Managing director of Designit, Australia and New Zealand

Should your business go back to the future?

In times of uncertainty, people gravitate towards the familiar. How can businesses capitalise on this to overcome the recessionary conditions brought on by COVID? Craig Flanders explains.

Craig Flanders

CEO, Spinach

Sign in