Aussies use connected home devices for consuming content but demand authenticity

Adobe survey finds trust in content is eroding, while consumers demand more immediate, entertaining and well-designed content

Australia is a leader when it comes to embracing the Internet of Things (IoT), and Australians are among world’s most likely to consume content from their connected home devices. But they may not actually trust what they see, a report claims.

In The State of Content: Expectations on the Rise report, Adobe surveyed more than 6000 consumers from the US, UK, France, Germany, Japan and Australia to highlight consumers’ changing attitudes about content, including a growing scepticism about online content.

The new connected customer

The report found Australia was the only country to have connected home devices and appliances such as smart refrigerators and thermostats, as one of the top five sources of content used daily. On average, Australians are accessing 11 sources of content through five different devices every day, with smartphones and laptops ranking as the most frequently used devices by millennials.

“Australians are generally early adopters of new technologies, so it’s no surprise to see the country is among the leaders in the adoption of connected home products such as internet connected fridges, home security systems and nanny cams,” managing director, Adobe Australia and New Zealand, Chris Skelton, said.

According to the report, 78 per cent of Australian consumers are embracing content across multiple screens. On average, they’re using more than two devices at the same time, slightly less than the global average. However, although they are using fewer devices, 52 per cent of Australians said they found using multiple devices distracting.

Increasing scepticism and less trust in content

Interestingly, the report found consumers are increasingly sceptical of the content they are consuming, with 55 per cent questioning whether a news article is biased or the author has been paid or incentivised to post a positive review. Over half are likely to question whether a photo in an ad has been altered.

In addition, over one-third of millennials value entertainment over accuracy, and more than half said they didn’t regularly fact-check the content they are sharing.

“With almost two in three Australian respondents saying they trust content from a family member or friend and significantly more than those saying they trust content from government officials or celebrities, it is becoming increasingly vital for brands to develop content that is authentic and to provide an accurate and valuable source of information,” Skelton commented.

“The ever-increasing volume of media and apps is overwhelming and as Australian consumers’ standards for digital content continue to rise, content must be authentic, well-designed and easy to consume or brands risk losing their audience.”

Engage with design

The study also revealed a new imperative for brands and creators to develop content that is well-designed, easily accessible and authentic.

With limited time, the report showed six in 10 Australians would choose to view something that is beautifully designed over something that is plain.

Australian consumers also reported they’re likely to stop viewing content or switch device if the content is unattractive in terms of layout and imagery, if the content is too long, or if the images won't load or take too long to load.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

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