Aussies use connected home devices for consuming content but demand authenticity

Adobe survey finds trust in content is eroding, while consumers demand more immediate, entertaining and well-designed content

Australia is a leader when it comes to embracing the Internet of Things (IoT), and Australians are among world’s most likely to consume content from their connected home devices. But they may not actually trust what they see, a report claims.

In The State of Content: Expectations on the Rise report, Adobe surveyed more than 6000 consumers from the US, UK, France, Germany, Japan and Australia to highlight consumers’ changing attitudes about content, including a growing scepticism about online content.

The new connected customer

The report found Australia was the only country to have connected home devices and appliances such as smart refrigerators and thermostats, as one of the top five sources of content used daily. On average, Australians are accessing 11 sources of content through five different devices every day, with smartphones and laptops ranking as the most frequently used devices by millennials.

“Australians are generally early adopters of new technologies, so it’s no surprise to see the country is among the leaders in the adoption of connected home products such as internet connected fridges, home security systems and nanny cams,” managing director, Adobe Australia and New Zealand, Chris Skelton, said.

According to the report, 78 per cent of Australian consumers are embracing content across multiple screens. On average, they’re using more than two devices at the same time, slightly less than the global average. However, although they are using fewer devices, 52 per cent of Australians said they found using multiple devices distracting.

Increasing scepticism and less trust in content

Interestingly, the report found consumers are increasingly sceptical of the content they are consuming, with 55 per cent questioning whether a news article is biased or the author has been paid or incentivised to post a positive review. Over half are likely to question whether a photo in an ad has been altered.

In addition, over one-third of millennials value entertainment over accuracy, and more than half said they didn’t regularly fact-check the content they are sharing.

“With almost two in three Australian respondents saying they trust content from a family member or friend and significantly more than those saying they trust content from government officials or celebrities, it is becoming increasingly vital for brands to develop content that is authentic and to provide an accurate and valuable source of information,” Skelton commented.

“The ever-increasing volume of media and apps is overwhelming and as Australian consumers’ standards for digital content continue to rise, content must be authentic, well-designed and easy to consume or brands risk losing their audience.”

Engage with design

The study also revealed a new imperative for brands and creators to develop content that is well-designed, easily accessible and authentic.

With limited time, the report showed six in 10 Australians would choose to view something that is beautifully designed over something that is plain.

Australian consumers also reported they’re likely to stop viewing content or switch device if the content is unattractive in terms of layout and imagery, if the content is too long, or if the images won't load or take too long to load.

Follow CMO on Twitter: @CMOAustralia, take part in the CMO conversation on LinkedIn: CMO ANZ, join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CMOAustralia, or check us out on Google+: google.com/+CmoAu

Join the newsletter!

Or
Error: Please check your email address.
Show Comments

Blog Posts

Social purpose: Oxygen for your brand health vitals

If trust is the new currency, then we’re in deep trouble. Here's why.

Carolyn Butler-Madden

Founder and CEO, Sunday Lunch

Customer experience disruption: Healthcare faces a bitter pill

Over the past decade, disruptors such as Amazon, Apple and Australia’s Atlassian have delivered technology enhanced customer experiences, which for the most part, have improved customers’ lives and delivered unparalleled growth. Can they do the same for healthcare?

Alex Allwood

Principal, All Work Together

How can a brand remain human in a digital world?

Some commentators estimate that by 2020, 85 per cent of buyer-seller interactions will happen online through social media and video*. That’s only two years away, and pertinent for any marketer.

James Kyd

Global head of brand strategy and marketing, Xero

https://bit.ly/2qLgzmR Transform your life a proven digital blueprint

Okitoi Steven

How this banking group tackled a digital marketing transformation

Read more

Its great to hear that companies including JCDecaux, oOh!media, Omnicom and Posterscope Australia have all partnered with Seedooh inorder...

Blue Mushroom Infozone Pvt Ltd

Out of home advertising companies strive for greater metrics and transparency

Read more

Much ado about nothingAnother fluff piece around what it could possibly do rather than what it is doing

gve

How AMP is using AI to create effortless ‘experiences’

Read more

is it true that Consumer expectations are also changing as a result. If we trust someone with our data there is also an expectation that ...

Sunita Madan

Society will decide where digital marketing takes us next: Oracle

Read more

This Blog is Very interesting to read and thank you for sharing the valuable information about Machine Learning. The information you prov...

johny blaze

What machine learning has done for the Virgin Velocity program

Read more

Latest Podcast

More podcasts

Sign in