Marketing Academy calls for second round of CMO hopefuls

Not-for-profit organisation launches the 2016 instalment of its marketing leadership program in Australia

The Marketing Academy has opened up nominations for the second year of its Australian Leaders Programme following the graduation of its first round of candidates.

The initiative was launched in Australia this year following its successful rollout in the UK, and gives up to 30 marketing professionals the opportunity to build their leadership skills and become the next generation of CMOs. The program includes 15 days of learning through one-on-one mentoring, leadership development workshops, bootcamps and executive couching. There’s also a series of lectures from noted global business and leadership speakers over the course of the six-month initiative.

To be included, marketers must be nominated by their peers then go through an interview process in order to be successfully chosen for the program, and must have at least 10 years’ experience in their field.

The selection process involves three stages, including a ‘showcase’ submission, taking part in a pitch process, then attending a panel interview.

This year’s cohort included a mix of professionals from the marketing, media and advertising space. Carlton & United Breweries head of international brands, Mick McKeown, who was a delegate this year, labelled the program an “extraordinary experience”.

“It not only helped me grow as a leader, but also as a person,” he said. Ï am truly grateful for what I have learnt and the people I have met, and while the selection process is intense, the reward is truly priceless.”

Read more: Training up the industry's future CMOs

This year’s list of 45 industry mentors, sponsors and experts included Foxtel’s executive GM of sales and marketing, Ed Smith; Suncorp group executive of marketing, Mark Reinke; Commonwealth Bank’s group executive marketing and strategy, Vittoria Shortt; Omnicom Media Group CEO, Leigh Terry; and Unilever CEO, Clive Stiff.

“As a founder supporter, we’re proud to return for our second year,” Smith said of Foxtel’s involvement. “Having seen the Marketing Academy in action, it has exceeded our already high expectations. There is no doubt in my mind this is the most exciting and comprehensive development opportunity available to aspiring CMOs in this market.”

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